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Reviews » DVD Video Reviews » One Last Thing
One Last Thing
Magnolia Home Entertainment // R // May 23, 2006
List Price: $29.98 [Buy now and save at Amazon]
Review by Francis Rizzo III | posted May 16, 2006 | E-mail the Author
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In 10 Words or Less
A young boy's real dying wish

Reviewer's Bias*
Loves: Good independent films, smart comedies
Likes: Michael Angarano
Dislikes: Cynthia Nixon
Hates:

The Movie
There's a comic, I think it's Chris Rock, who talks about a dying kid's wish, and how it would be to have some big breasts in his face. For a teenaged boy, that's a much more realistic fantasy than most of the wishes you hear being fulfilled. So when Dylan (Michael Angarano, Sky High) gets the chance to have his dying wish fulfilled, it makes sense that it's not the opportunity to fish with a football star, but to spend the weekend with supermodel Nikki Sinclair (Sunny Mabrey, XXX: State of the Union).

It's not going to be an easy wish to fulfill though, as Nikki is on a destructive spiral down in New York, and Dylan's cancer is taking its toll on his life in a blue-collar Philadelphia suburb. But as is the case in movies, their lives, through the machinations of good people and less-so, cross paths. If this sounds like a very simplistic story with an somewhat moralistic tone, it most certainly is. But it works thanks to some good writing, solid directing and quality acting.

The most impressive part of the movie is the way the more serious scenes co-exist with the comedy, without feeling like a compilation of scenes, and instead coming off as a cohesive movie. Dealing with Dylan's illness is a large part of the film, whether it's done in hospital rooms or through the nosebleeds that remind you how sick he is. This "heaviness" gives the film a chance to get philosophical, and gives the production a real meaningful feel.

At the same time, this is a movie about a smartass teen looking to hook up with a model, and there's a lot of fun stuff happening, especially with Dylan's two horny and goofy buddies tagging along. Then some mysticism creeps in, as Dylan meets a cast of unique characters who help him on his way, including a Brooklyn-style Hindu philosopher and a cabbie played by Wyclef Jean. Throw in some unexplained visions of his dead father (an uncredited Ethan Hawke), and the film feels like one of those quirky fables that will stick with you for a while.

Giving another strong performance, Angarano is the kind of young actor who is much better than his age and experience should allow, and this role is the perfect match for him. Playing his part with a blend of dark comedy and pure pathos, he's beyond likeable, but never cloying, which puts him head and shoulders over other actors his age. The casting of his partners in crime is just as good, as their squeaky voices and awkward posture resonate as real. The trio's performances help sell the story, by keeping it grounded when the plot gets either heavy or flighty.

Alex Steyermark's follow-up to his directorial debut, Prey for Rock & Roll, is a more complete film, and, removing him from his music background, allows him to show his strengths, which include conversations and real emotion. The style that dominated his previous movie is stripped down to honesty here, and his actors respond with very good performances, including Cynthia Nixon, as Dylan's Mom, and Mabry, as the object of his affections. It says a lot that Steyermark is able to prevent this story from taking the inevitable fall into melodrama or heartless shtick, and instead balances everything in a delicate combination.

The DVD
One Last Thing... is a one-DVD release, packed in a standard keepcase, without an insert. The disc has a static letterboxed full-frame main menu, with options to view the film, adjust the languages, select scenes and check out special features. Set-up choices include Spanish subtitles and English Dolby Digital 5.1 and 2.0 tracks, as well as English Closed Captioning. The chapter-selection menus have still previews and titles for each scene.

The Quality
Shot on high-definition video, the film's anamorphic widescreen transfer is just about technically perfect, with spot-on color, excellent detail and no visible dirt, damage or digital artifacts. The color palette is very defined, giving Dylan's world a dull look and New York City a more vibrant feel. Score another victory for HD video.

Considering Steyermark's career as a sound and music editor, it's no surprise that this disc's aural presentation is terrific. The dialogue is clean and crisp, and the music mix keeps everything nicely separated and strong. Some nice atmospheric sound makes its way to the sides and rear, along with more of the soundtrack to spread the sound out a bit. Overall, it sounds very nice, delivering an appropriate track for this film.

The Extras
The extras kick-off with five minutes of outtakes that show a bit more of three moments from the film, including some stunt work. It's cute, but nothing great.

More interesting is an episode of "Higher Definition," HDNet's film series with Robert Wilonsky, which focuses on the making of the movie (an HDNet production.) Obviously, it's a bit of corportate synergy, but it takes the place of your usual studio-produced fluff and is entertaining in doing so.

In the most extensive extra, Steyermark provides a feature-length audio commentary, sharing stories from the production and his thoughts on the actors and story. Though he slips into praise a bit too easily, his insight is good. Unfortunately, his energy level is just a bit higher than Steven Wright's, which makes the track drag slightly.

The disc wraps with four trailers, including this film's theatrical preview.

The Bottom Line
I have a soft spot in my heart for films that try something different and create a world all their own, and One Last Thing... is one of those movies. Quality performances, including rising star Angarano's, combines with the writing and direction to create an entertaining and thought-provoking movie that isn't easy to shake following the credits. The DVD brings a solid presentation and decent extras to the table to make this disc worth checking out. If you're looking for a good time that strikes a chord in your heart and mind, this is one disc you should check out.


Francis Rizzo III is a native Long Islander, where he works in academia. In his spare time, he enjoys watching hockey, writing and spending time with his wife, daughter and puppy.

Check out 1106 - A Moment in Fictional Time or his convention blog called Conning Fellow


*The Reviewer's Bias section is an attempt to help readers use the review to its best effect. By knowing where the reviewer's biases lie on the film's subject matter, one can read the review with the right mindset.

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