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Reviews » DVD Video Reviews » Broken Embraces
Broken Embraces
Sony Pictures // R // March 16, 2010
List Price: $28.96 [Buy now and save at Amazon]
Review by Brian Orndorf | posted March 9, 2010 | E-mail the Author
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C O N T E N T
V I D E O
A U D I O
E X T R A S
R E P L A Y
A D V I C E
Highly Recommended
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P R I N T
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THE FILM

For his 17th film, Pedro Almodovar doesn't exactly break new ground with "Broken Embraces," instead fine-tuning his gifts and decadent cinematic appetites to a satisfying routine. A spiraling, sensual story of noirish obsession and paranoia, "Embraces" is a riveting sit, due in great part to the filmmaker's incredible storytelling gifts, and the cast, who articulate a dreamy series of toxic encounters with sniper-like precision, tightening Almodovar's noose with exceptional skill.

Harry Caine (Lluis Homar) is a blind writer who was once a filmmaker by the name of Mateo. When Caine learns of the death of wealthy industrialist Ernesto Martel (Jose Luis Gomez), it sends his mind reeling back to the early 1990s, when he was prepping a film with lead actress, and Martel's lover, Lena (Penelope Cruz), while dealing with a behind-the-scenes documentary effort from Martel's social reject son (Ruben Ochandiano). Engaging in a heated affair with Lena, Mateo learns of Martel's violent ways, hoping to steal Lena away and finish his artistic gamble of a movie. Now over a decade later, Caine feels the rush of memories as he recalls his love affair to assistant Diego (Tamar Novas), unlocking further secrets from his close associates.

Almodovar, who extinguished his rascally ways long ago to hone his craft as a master of melodrama, doesn't push any boundaries with "Broken Embraces." There are no hysterical acts of tragedy or flamboyant characters drawing attention to themselves. While far from hushed, "Embraces" is the Spanish's filmmaker most relaxed piece of work in ages, calmly turning the pages of the script, working through this knotted tale of despair with a strapping confidence. Perhaps the picture lacks the gravitas of "Volver" or "All About My Mother," but there's no mistaking Almodovar's poise with "Embrace," or his technical proficiency (aided by Rodrigo Prieto's sumptuous cinematography).

"Embraces" explores the nature of dual identities and romantic paranoia, carefully molded by Almodovar into a mild exercise of suspense, following Caine/Mateo as his carnal cravings lead him into Martel's trap, with Lena as the unexpected bait. Broken down into flashbacks and modern-day revelations, the filmmaker corrals a colorful cast of characters to connect a story of deception and tragedy, continually twisting perspective and tone (a portion of the film plays as satire of film production) to keep the viewer off balance and eternally curious. It's a Telenovela saga of woe for Lena and Mateo, glazed by Almodovar with marvelous performances and a smoky ambiance of surveillance and Hitchcockian desire, accentuating the tension and the longing to captivating degrees.

THE DVD

Visual:

The anamorphic widescreen (2.35:1 aspect ratio) presentation suffers from EE ringing issues throughout the film, which tend to reduce Almodovar's opulent vision. Skintones are accurate and duly pumped up to achieve a carnival of flesh, and colors look primarily preserved, with lush reds and bright yellows taking center stage. Black levels suffice without feeling overwhelmed, not clouding information, but not exactly encouraging it either. The visual experience seems to benefit vista cinematography over heated close-ups, which dilutes the lasting effect of the picture.

Audio:

The 5.1 Dolby Digital audio mix highlights the melodramatic mood of the film superbly, leading strongly with Alberto Iglesias's pronounced score, with benefits from a generous bottom end and careful placement throughout the film. Dialogue also sounds clean, with the verbal sprinting holding tight in the front. Film set and beach sequences offer good atmospherics, with some of the more aggressive dramatic displays also finding circular comfort to assist in the feature's honeyed tone. A French track is also available.

Subtitles:

English and French subtitles are offered.

Extras:

"The Cannibalistic Councillor" (7:34) is the film within the film ("Girls and Suitcases"), spotlighting actress Carmen Machi as Chon, who spends a few moments discussing sensuality, eating flan, and snorting cocaine, while conversing with a comatose pal.

"Deleted Scenes" (12:20) offer more secrets inside of an old editing notebook, present an outstanding sequence where our lead characters dine inside of an experimental pitch-black restaurant, and add another moment with Lena in actress mode in "Girls and Suitcases."

"Pedro Directs Penelope" (5:53) is footage of the director guiding his prized actress through a range of emotions and reactions while shooting a "Girls with Suitcases" scene. It's a marvelous peek into the directorial process, not to mention a snapshot of pure trust as Cruz attempts to decode Almodovar's jumbled impulses.

"On the Red Carpet: The New York Film Festival Closing Night" (3:13) submits premiere footage as the stars and filmmaker gathered to celebrate a screening of the film.

"Variety Q&A with Penelope Cruz" (6:18) showcases critic Todd McCarthy as his grills Cruz on her creative choices, time with Almodovar, and acting origins.

And a Theatrical Trailer is also included.

FINAL THOUGHTS

The extremes of Martel's control are fascinating (at one point hiring a lip reader to decode on-set communication between Mateo and Lena), and Almodovar does a proper job bending allegiances to keep the story on its toes, with a few sucker punches waiting in the dark to strike. Perhaps the lack of a challenging narrative for "Broken Embraces" will disappoint those who enjoy their Almodovar firing on all cylinders, but it's impossible to disregard the craftsmanship of the picture and its occasional devilish surprise.


For further online adventure, please visit brianorndorf.com
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