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Reviews » DVD Video Reviews » Teen Wolf / Teen Wolf Too
Teen Wolf / Teen Wolf Too
MGM // PG // August 27, 2002
List Price: $14.95 [Buy now and save at Amazon]
Review by Earl Cressey | posted August 4, 2002 | E-mail the Author
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Out of his numerous film roles, Michael J. Fox will probably always be best remembered for his character Marty McFly in the Back to the Future trilogy, though his role as Scott Howard in Teen Wolf comes in, at least for me, a fairly close second. Not that the film or his performance is all that great, but that both together are rather memorable. While not a huge success, the film did well enough at the box office that it spawned an animated series and a sequel, Teen Wolf Too, which starred Jason Bateman as Todd Howard, Scott's cousin. Both films are now contained in a double feature disc by MGM. While there are two versions of Teen Wolf, the theatrical and TV versions, the theatrical version is the one present on the disc. The additional scenes in the TV version are not contained on the DVD.

In Teen Wolf, Scott Howard is your average teenager, and like most teenagers, wishes to be something more. Unlike most of us, he gets his wish when he finds out he can transform into a werewolf. He decides to use his newfound abilities to lead his basketball team to a championship and to impress Pamela, the high school babe. However, he soon learns that being a werewolf isn't all its cracked up to be, and that, just maybe, he had everything he wanted without being a werewolf.

In Teen Wolf Too, Scott's cousin Todd goes to college on an athletic scholarship, despite the fact that all he wants to do is major in science and become a veterinarian. However, life at college is made more complicated when he discovers he can change into a werewolf, and by using those powers, he can become popular, lead his boxing team to a championship, and impress Nicki, a college babe. However, he soon discovers that being a werewolf isn't all its cracked up to be, and that, just maybe, he had everything he wanted without being a werewolf.

If the two movies sound similar, it's because they are almost exactly the same. They both also use the same formula common to most teen movies: the average guy falls for the cutest girl in the school, but when he can actually get her, he decides to stick with the average girl who has loved him all along for who he really is. To help Teen Wolf Too attract the audience of the first, Scott's friends, coach, and dad return, albeit half of them played by different actors. Had the script offered something different from the original besides minor cosmetic changes, then perhaps it would be worth watching, but as is, the less said about it, the better. Not to say that Teen Wolf is without problems, as it certainly had a few. For starters, Teen Wolf had a fairly weak resolution to the story, after building up the tension between Scott and Mick. While his mom is mentioned in passing, she's never shown, nor is anything said of what happened to her or why she's not in the film. There's also no mention of why his family can transform into werewolves. And the corniest moment in the film has to be when Scott's dad gives him the "with great power comes great responsibility" speech. Despite all this, while Teen Wolf is merely an average film, it is certainly leagues better than Teen Wolf Too, as the sequel lacks the heart and charisma that Michael J. Fox brought to his role in the original.

Video:
Both Teen Wolf and Teen Wolf Too are presented in both 1.85:1 anamorphic widescreen. Both transfers are quite good, with only a few marks or specks throughout. While colors throughout Teen Wolf are natural, with accurate flesh tones, and decent blacks, Teen Wolf Too is a different story. The transfer seems overly dark throughout much of Teen Wolf Too, which makes for drab colors and somewhat pale flesh tones.

Audio:
Teen Wolf is presented in Dolby 2.0 Mono and Teen Wolf Too is presented in Dolby 2.0 Stereo Surround. The tracks for both films adequately present the material, though the music in Teen Wolf could've benefited from a stereo surround track. Dialogue throughout Teen Wolf and most of Teen Wolf Too is clean and easy to understand, though some of it in Teen Wolf Too sounds hollow or tiny. Both have optional subtitles in English, Spanish, and French.

Extras:
Trailers for both films are included.

Summary:
Though the first Teen Wolf is a classic eighties comedy, Teen Wolf Too is better off forgotten. Despite the fact that the disc is short on extras, both films are given a good presentation and the MSRP is definitely right for fans. Newcomers might want to try the films as a rental first, however.

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