The Eyes Of Tammy Faye
Other
Review by Aaron Beierle | posted January 18, 2001
M O V I E
V I D E O
A U D I O
E X T R A S
R E P L A Y
A D V I C E
Rent It
E - M A I L
this review to a friend
R E V I E W S
Graphical Version
The Movie:

I didn't know quite what to expect from "The Eyes Of Tammy Faye", a documentary on the woman whose marriage to Jim Baker resulted in a giant rise and an embarassing fall that resulted from scandal. She's always been famous (infamous?) for her massive use of make-up, and the question remained if she would actually make a good subject for a documentary.

Suprisingly, "The Eyes of Tammy Faye" actually makes her out to be a pretty fascinating subject. The movie is not without some flaws as some of it is a bit overly dramatic in the fashion of the E-channel's "True Hollywood Story" documentaries. Still, it's interesting to see Tammy Faye not as the overly colorful and cartoony character that we see in interviews and on TV, but as someone who has survived a lot of heartbreak in her life (much of the movie seems like "...and then things got worse for Tammy Faye...and then they got even worse."), and someone who has done so with good spirit.

The documentary is even split into different chapters with puppets reading the titles. As we find out, the early work of Jim and Tammy Faye was putting on a puppet show that was broadcast. The film also moves at quite a quick pace - at about 80 minutes, the movie tells us what it wants to put across about its subject without rambling on too long about any one topic.


The DVD

VIDEO: As seemingly with most of the titles co-released by indie Lion's Gate and Universal, the picture quality is fine, but maybe not quite as good as it could be. "The Eyes Of Tammy Faye" is presented in non-anamorphic full-screen and the quality is certainly passable, but sometimes varries. The new interviews with various people involved in the life of Tammy Faye look generally good; they are slightly soft and lack a crisp look, but are certainly watchable. The older footage of her early years varies from looking fair to good.

Aside from some problems with some of the older footage and the occasional softness, there isn't really that much to complain about. There aren't any print flaws and I didn't see much in the way of other artifacts to take away from the image quality. Colors are generally natural although not terribly vibrant or bold. The material here doesn't really translate into stunning visuals, but the DVD does an acceptable job at showing the film's scenes.

SOUND: The Dolby 2.0 audio is generally "documentary audio" with a focus on the score and the interviews and dialogue. The score sounds crisp and clear, although again, it's a little too overly dramatic at times. Interviews and dialogue from footage sounds a bit varied in clarity at times, but generally is easily understood.

MENUS:: Menus are non-animated, with very basic images serving as backgrounds.

EXTRAS: The trailer.

Final Thoughts: It may sound weird (and much of it really is pretty odd), but Tammy Faye turns out to be a pretty interesting character. Although the DVD is pretty average with fair audio and video quality, it still might be worth a look for some as a rental.



Copyright 2014 Kleinman.com Inc. All Rights Reserved. Legal Info, Privacy Policy DVDTalk.com is a Trademark of Kleinman.com Inc.