Overnight
ThinkFilm // R // $26.98 // June 28, 2005
Review by Aaron Beierle | posted June 27, 2005
M O V I E
V I D E O
A U D I O
E X T R A S
R E P L A Y
A D V I C E
Highly Recommended
E - M A I L
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R E V I E W S
Graphical Version
The Movie:


"The Boondock Saints" has become a cult hit over the years since its release, but I doubt many know the full story behind the making of the picture. "Overnight" features one of the nastiest people you'll meet in a film - Troy Duffy. Duffy was a bouncer and bartender in a Boston bar, and his screenplay, "The Boondock Saints", was bought by Harvey Weinstein for Miramax Pictures. Not only was Duffy plucked from obscurity, he had the chance to direct the film and he was bought the bar that he worked at, to boot.

And, as we over the next 110 minutes and change, Duffy took the chance and absolutely, utterly destroyed it. Filmmakers Mark Brian Smith and Tony Montana follow Duffy around as he becomes so increasingly difficult to deal with that the notoriously difficult Harvey Weinstein doesn't want anything to do with him. Overnight, Duffy turns from demanding everything his way to demanding someone take his phone call. Duffy continually spouts off about how they're going to regret it, they're going to come knocking at his door. Not surprisingly, they don't.

Duffy is greedy, arrogant and has an ego (not a moment goes by where he doesn't discuss how he's better than anyone else at just about everything) the size of Hollywood. He verbally abuses just about everyone who demonstrates some sort of care for the guy: friends, family (one scene where he puts down his own brother is absolutely saddening), etc. During the course of "Overnight", we watch as he burns every single bridge and yet, I almost felt sorry for the guy. This is a guy so terrible, so full of himself, such a jerk in a way that feels indicative of serious emotional problems - to the degree where the DVD should have offered a commentary by a team of psychiatrists.

"Boondock Saints" eventually got made and eventually did well on video. However, the movie had to operate on half the original budget, be made independently and without the kind of control that Duffy would have originally had. Duffy's band also loses its record deal. The incredibly bitter Duffy (one of the last scenes has him snapping at film students who are merely trying to ask some questions) hasn't done anything since.

In the end, "Overnight" isn't only an interesting look at a project in trouble, but it's an engaging look and regarding how important it is to have people around us supporting us and to treat them with the same kind of respect that they're trying to give us.

The DVD

VIDEO: "Overnight" is presented by ThinkFilm in 1.78:1 anamorphic widescreen. The presentation was generally first-rate, considering the material. The low-budget documentary, likely filmed on video, appeared mostly crisp and clear, although some moments - depending on shooting conditions - could look a little soft.

Other faults were nothing too notable; they included some minor shimmering, a couple of moments of pixelation and some mild-to-moderate grain in some low-light sequences. Colors looked natural and bright, with only a little bit of smearing in some of the darker scenes.

SOUND: "Overnight" is presented in Dolby Digital 5.1. The soundtrack offers fine documentary audio, with clear dialogue and music.

EXTRAS: A pair of deleted scenes are offered, as well as an interview with the directors, the trailer and promos for upcoming ThinkFilm titles.

Final Thoughts: "Overnight" is a troubling and engaging portrait of a man who was given a remarkable deal and proceeded to become so self-destructive that it was all taken away as fast as it was given. The DVD edition offers fine audio/video quality and a couple of supplements. Recommended.



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