Coneheads
Paramount
Review by Chris Hughes | posted May 14, 2001
M O V I E
V I D E O
A U D I O
E X T R A S
R E P L A Y
A D V I C E
Skip It
E - M A I L
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R E V I E W S
Graphical Version
Features: Widescreen Anamorphic - 1.85:1. Audio Tracks: English (Dolby Digital 5.1), English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround), French (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround). Subtitles: English. Theatrical trailer.

The Movie:
Let me begin this review by saying that the Coneheads skits on the original Saturday Night Live were among my favorite segments. There was something so completely over the top and surreal about the pieces that I couldn't help but break into uncontrollable laughter. I of course am not alone in my assessment so it's no big surprise that Loren Michaels made the Coneheads into a full fledged feature film in 1993.

If you've seen any of the original skits you'll probably have a pretty good idea of what to expect from this movie. Dan Aykroyd and Jane Curtin reprise their roles as Beldar and Prymatt, two aliens who find themselves stranded on Earth. The film follows their trials and tribulations as they try to fit into a society that's decidedly different from their own. The only departure from the original Conehead format is a bigger budget and a longer format.

Over the years Saturday Night spawned films have experienced varying degrees of success. Some like the It's Pat movie barely registered on the radar screen while others including Wayne's World were wildly popular. Unfortunately Coneheads falls into the former category. The script is unfunny, the performances by the primary actors are uninspired and the addition of such comic talents as Michael McKean, Phil Hartman, Chris Farley, Adam Sandler and David Spade don't help at all. In the end we're left with the impression that the entire film is just one big money grab with little if any redeeming qualities.

The Picture:
On the technical side of things Coneheads fares a little better. The movie is transferred from nearly pristine 35mm elements. The colors are deeply saturated without bleeding, the black levels are velvety and deep, sharpness is right on the money and I wasn't able to detect any but the most minor of digital artifacts.

The Sound:
The Coneheads audio track is full blown Dolby Digital 5.1 but it uses only a fraction of the formats potential. There is a little left / right panning, some surround activity and one or two thumps in the LFE but the track maintains a very mono feel. Most of the dialogue and music is planted firmly in the center of the soundstage. The dynamic range is fairly limited as well so don't expect this disc to give your home theater a work out.

The Extras:
Paramount isn't exactly known for their special editions and Coneheads does nothing to shore up that reputation. The only extra on this disc is a rather battered version of the original theatrical trailer.

Conclusion:
Some may disagree with me but in my opinion Coneheads is just one colossal waste of time. I didn't even crack a single smile while watching the film. My advice is to avoid this movie at all costs. Rating: Skip it.



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