Bob Saget: That Ain't Right
HBO // Unrated // $19.98 // August 28, 2007
Review by Preston Jones | posted August 26, 2007
M O V I E
V I D E O
A U D I O
E X T R A S
R E P L A Y
A D V I C E
Skip It
E - M A I L
this review to a friend
R E V I E W S
Graphical Version
The Movie

Bob Saget had something of a career reinvention with the 2005 documentary The Aristocrats. All those years of hosting "America's Funniest Home Videos" or mugging his way through several seasons of "Full House" didn't really prepare America for his debased, foul and searingly crude sense of humor that had been heretofore obscured from view. His brief appearance in Penn Jillette and Paul Provenza's side-splitting doc was enough to endear him to an entirely new generation of fans, one comfortable with the irony of his previous work and the anything-goes mentality of his career going forward.

His inaugural HBO special, Bob Saget: That Ain't Right, does not, unfortunately, capitalize on his new-found street cred. Profanity and disgusting trains of thought can be funny in the right hands, but Saget is like a gleeful five-year-old throughout most of the special's 55-minute run time. He cannot go more than three seconds without swearing, lamely attempting to sound like a gangsta rapper, vaguely referencing some kind of sex act and/or his own genitals, randomly switching topics and generally making it really hard to keep up. There are genuinely funny bits buried in most of Saget's non-sequitur laced monologues, but the laughs (at least for me) were very few and excruciatingly far between.

Saget rebounds a bit towards the end of his routine, employing a deadpan take on his "Full House" character (having composed a song -- "Danny Tanner Was Not Gay" to the tune of the Backstreet Boys' "I Want It That Way") but it's too little, too late. Perhaps the object lesson here is that Saget works best in small doses -- whether it's five minutes in a documentary or 22 minutes on a TV sitcom. Whatever the reason, this is a failed attempt at funny that suggests Saget isn't nearly as cool as he'd like us to think he is. That ain't right? Try that ain't all that funny.

The DVD

The Video:

Presented in a razor-sharp 1.78:1 anamorphic widescreen transfer, Bob Saget: That Ain't Right is crystal clear and free from defect. It's a pristine visual representation of newly created material that looks vibrant and smooth. No complaints here.

The Audio:

All the dirty jokes and filthy songs are heard clearly, with no distortion or drop-out, on this Dolby 2.0 stereo track. The audience's laughter and applause never drowns Saget out. No optional subtitles are provided.

The Extras:

The lone supplements are a nine minute, 27 second featurette titled "Strollin' with Saget" that follows the comedian around New York City as he prepares for his gig and a three minute, 27 second music video for "Rollin' with Saget" that features goofy cameos from John Stamos, Jamie Kennedy and George Lucas.

Final Thoughts:

Perhaps the object lesson here is that Bob Saget works best in small doses -- whether it's five minutes in a documentary or 22 minutes on a TV sitcom. Whatever the reason, this is a failed attempt at funny that suggests Saget isn't nearly as cool as he'd like us to think he is. That ain't right? Try that ain't all that funny. Skip it.



Copyright 2014 Kleinman.com Inc. All Rights Reserved. Legal Info, Privacy Policy DVDTalk.com is a Trademark of Kleinman.com Inc.