David Blaine: Fearless
Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment // Unrated // $19.99 // May 14, 2002
Review by Aaron Beierle | posted May 10, 2002
M O V I E
V I D E O
A U D I O
E X T R A S
R E P L A Y
A D V I C E
Highly Recommended
E - M A I L
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R E V I E W S
Graphical Version
The Movie:

Magic is certainly an art form and one that has been around for ages. Yet, magic has lost its footing in popular culture today, as most audiences consider the kind of smoke and mirrors magic that many think of to be rather corny. David Blaine seems to be the sole provider of a kind of "new school" magic. Rather than being on the stage, Blaine simply carries a deck of cards with him from city-to-city, stopping people on the street and doing card tricks, as well as other things like biting quarters in half and spitting them back together. In one stunt, Blaine throws a deck of cards against a window after someone has chosen one card out of the deck. The one card they chose has not only stuck to the window, but stuck to the other side of the window. That's only the begining.

Blaine simply takes the tricks to new heights. Where I've had theories about how tricks were accomplished in the past, I'm simply baffled as to how Blaine achieves any of his stunts. He's so casual about it, as well, chatting up people on the street and leaving them as stunned and entertained as I'd guess most viewers of his specials are.

"Fearless" is not a new program from Blaine, it's actually something a bit better. Blaine has had three specials on ABC over the past few years, "Street Magic" (1996), "Magic Man" (1998) and "Frozen In Time" (2000). All three of these specials are included on this DVD, allowing newcomers to catch up to Blaine's stunning magic. The first two specials focus on Blaine walking through the streets and performing tricks for people; the third offers more street magic, but also captures one of Blaine's biggest stunts: freezing himself in a block of ice...for 62 hours...standing up.


The DVD

VIDEO: All three specials are presented in their original 1.33:1 aspect ratios. The picture quality is actually slightly better than the broadcast, as the three specials are consistently quite sharp and well-defined, with no softness to be found. Aside from the slightest bit of noise, no concerns with the picture quality arose. Colors appeared bright, nicely saturated and not smeared.

SOUND: All three specials are presented in stereo sound and offer very good audio quality, with easily understood conversations and clear background sounds.

MENUS: Very cool main and sub-menus meant to look like an old film. There also may be a hidden little trailer for Blaine's next stunt in one of the menus.

EXTRAS: About 9 1/2 minutes of outtakes and articles from the New York Times. Look for a pyschic menu area starring Blaine, as well.

Final Thoughts: All three specials are extremely entertaining, amazing and a lot of fun. Buena Vista has created a very nice DVD that's low-priced as well, as it can be found in the $15 range. Highly Recommended.




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