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Reviews » DVD Video Reviews » Tenderness
Tenderness
Lionsgate Home Entertainment // R // April 13, 2010
List Price: $28.98 [Buy now and save at Amazon]
Review by Brian Orndorf | posted April 23, 2010 | E-mail the Author
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C O N T E N T
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THE FILM

The psychological drama "Tenderness" feels like a 1000-piece jigsaw puzzle dumped all over a floor, with the production feeling around the jagged edges and indistinct colors to put together a cryptic tale of compulsion. Though it doesn't impart the lasting jolt it's searching for, the picture is crowded with captivating tones and contemplation, navigating a tricky tale of murder, perversion, and obsession with a fine edge of suspense and an interesting take on the human condition.

Lori (Sophie Traub) is a miserable teenager with a laundry list of troubles. To escape from her pain, she fantasizes about Eric (Jon Foster), a juvenile murderer about to be released from prison. Eric has a lot on his mind as he reenters society, with hopes that his spirituality will lead him down a path of good. Running away from home, Lori tracks down and joins Eric as he embarks on a road trip to meet a particularly tempting acquaintance (Alexis Dziena). Initially hesitant, Eric soon takes an interest in Lori, desperately fighting his instinct to kill her along the way. Making sure Eric behaves is Lieutenant Cristofuoro (Russell Crowe), the cop who originally arrested Eric and remains convinced he'll kill again.

"Tenderness" elects a dreamlike structure to develop its cast of characters, striking an unsettling tenor of potential horror to step inside the minds of these shattered people, each confronting problematic urges that will surely lead them to catastrophe. It's not exactly a mystery, despite the question mark of Eric's depraved behavior. Instead, director John Polson ("Swimfan," "Hide and Seek") looks to study the three main players, searching to understand what drives them into vicious situations, and how they battle to retain a sense of normalcy while their domestic situations and shattered lives compel them to reach for ruin.

Adapted from the novel by Robert Cormier, "Tenderness" is a delicate psychological examination that handles more significantly standing perfectly still than it does when time comes for thriller mode. The shades of doubt are handled properly by the cast, and the film is most confident observing the havoc within Eric as he forces himself to bury his homicidal itches, while Lori gingerly takes on this former killer as if he were a teen idol -- waiting for a return of affection that will whisk her away from her familial troubles. Polson doesn't always understand where to steer the story, but he expresses agitation superbly, building an askew logic for Lori and Eric that keeps them together, bonding over their evildoing secrets. Cristofuoro is a supporting player, but Crowe projects a heavy sense of professional duty that drags the character along the interstates, on the hunt for a boy he refuses to forgive.

THE DVD

Visual:

The anamorphic widescreen (2.35:1 aspect ratio) presentation retains the cinematography's naturalistic leanings, delivering a capable submersion into forest greens and domestic grays. Colors are stable, though often purposely washed out. Skintones retain their natural feel, while black levels hold their ground despite some difficult evening sequences. The downbeat ambiance of mounting threat is sustained here without any trouble, thought a few instances of print damage were detected

Audio:

The 5.1 Dolby Digital sound mix here is mostly frontal and crisp, keeping the uncomfortable mood alive through a compelling blend of mournful scoring cues and dialogue passages. Everything is easily discernable and right up front, creating more of a mono feel, which actually assists the intimacy Polson is searching for. A 2.0 mix is also included.

Subtitles:

English and Spanish subtitles are included.

Extras:

"Finding Tenderness: Bringing the Novel to the Screen" (6:04) is quite a valuable supplementary feature, with cast and crew discussing the challenges of adaptation, and how Polson's efforts helped to elevate the production experience.

A Theatrical Trailer has not been included.

FINAL THOUGHTS

"Tenderness" submits a few twists to stay ahead of the audience, but the lunges for irony seem to satisfy literary requirements over cinematic ones. It's a gripping picture, but only through scenes of ominous deliberation, where the characters stand on the precipice of choice, trying their best to play it safe, while every impulse within tells them to jump into the abyss.


For further online adventure, please visit brianorndorf.com
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