2 Broke Girls: Season 3
Warner Bros. // Unrated // $38.99 // October 14, 2014
Review by Aaron Beierle | posted November 9, 2014
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R E V I E W S
Graphical Version
The Show:

"Two Broke Girls" is pretty much the same 30 minutes over-and-over again (literally, the show rarely veers from its core, down to the quota of jokes devoted to each character's traits (Han is short) every episode. However, it's a credit to the series that what is probably the most repetitive sitcom on television is often genuinely funny due to the writing and particularly the strong performances of the two leads (who have great chemistry.)

The series focuses on Max Black (Kat Dennings) and Caroline Channing (Beth Behrs), two girls who find themselves as unlikely friends after Caroline's father is busted in a Madoff-like financial scheme. She winds up moving in with Max in a low-key Brooklyn apartment. They work at a diner run by Han (Matthew Moy) and populated by Earl (Garrett Morris) and Oleg (Jonathan Kite). The oddest thing about the diner is that it - as well as the outfits the characters wear - are so 80's that I often have to stop and realize that the series is set in present day.

The third season of the series sees the show go off the rails a bit from the standpoint of someone apparently thought the need for the two main characters to have relationships. The result kind of highlights the idea that the series really works because pf the chemistry with the two leads, as well as the variations on the core idea (and every episode is largely tweaks on the same ideas) and writing.

Throwing relationships into the mix really kind of starts to bring things to a halt. It's not that you don't want to see these characters have relationships as much as it is about the idea that, in sort of a "Seinfeld" way, this show was never about feelings, it's about densely-packed riffs and one-liners. Occasionally, there's sweetness in this series - little flashes of kindness - that work. Otherwise, it's not "Friends" (the show's diner is certainly the anti-Central Perk), there's never going to be a Ross and Rachel here.

The series continues to follow the two girls with their attempt to run their cupcake business, which has been "off and on" in a way that any sitcom relationship would be. This season, the girls have found the secret back room of the diner (which was the focus of the last episode of the second season) and have opened for business. "And the Soft Opening" and "And the Cronuts" are highlights, as the two find themselves with crowds after a British rock star croaks in front of the shop and the girls make an attempt to capitalize on the Cronut craze (meanwhile, the show still focuses on cupcakes, despite the cupcake craze being fairly long over.)

However, around the halfway point of the season, Max and Caroline head to pastry school and things kind of fall apart. Max starts to have feelings for Deke (Eric Andre), while Caroline falls for a head baker (Gilles Marini), who has a secret. Meanwhile, Mary Lynn Rajskub - who is quite funny - is thrown into the mix playing an oddball working at the front desk. Rajskub is funny, but the character is never really given much of a purpose.

Thankfully, all of these threads are really pushed aside towards the end of the season and the series starts to get back to what it does best. The last episode of the season, which sees Max heading back to her old high school to get her diploma, is a great example of the series - it's genuinely funny, sweet and really shows the chemistry well between the two leads.

This season tries to step outside the box and broaden the series a little, but it thankfully realizes that what really works is the core elements - that same 30 minutes of fun that's largely based around the diner and the apartment. The fourth season has started off well - impressive that the series has gotten as far as it has given how quickly most network sitcoms are cancelled these days, as ABC's "Selfie" becomes another example of a good show that isn't given a chance to go through its first season.

49 3-01 23/Sep/13 And the Soft Opening
50 3-02 30/Sep/13 And the Kickstarter
51 3-03 07/Oct/13 And the Kitty Kitty Spank Spank
52 3-04 14/Oct/13 And the Group Head
53 3-05 21/Oct/13 And the Cronuts
54 3-06 28/Oct/13 And the Piece of Sheet
55 3-07 04/Nov/13 And the Girlfriend Experience
56 3-08 11/Nov/13 And the 'It' Hole
57 3-09 18/Nov/13 And the Pastry Porn
58 3-10 25/Nov/13 And the First Day of School
59 3-11 02/Dec/13 And the Life After Death
60 3-12 16/Dec/13 And the French Kiss
61 3-13 13/Jan/14 And the Big But
62 3-14 20/Jan/14 And the Dumpster Sex
63 3-15 27/Jan/14 And the Icing on the Cake
64 3-16 03/Feb/14 And the ATM
65 3-17 24/Feb/14 And the Married Man Sleepover
66 3-18 03/Mar/14 And the Near Death Experience
67 3-19 17/Mar/14 And the Kilt Trip
68 3-20 24/Mar/14 And the Not Broke Parents
69 3-21 14/Apr/14 And the Wedding Cake Cake Cake
70 3-22 21/Apr/14 And the New Lease on Life
71 3-23 28/Apr/14 And the Free Money
72 3-24 05/May/14 And the First Degree

Video:
"Two Broke Girls" is presented by Warner Brothers in 1.85:1 anamorphic widescreen. The presentation remained quite nice, matching digital cable quality with a clean, crisp appearance and pleasing detail. Colors looked warm and bright, with no smearing or other faults.

Audio:
"Two Broke Girls" is presented by Warner in Dolby Digital 5.1. The show's certainly dialogue-driven, with minimal activity beyond dialogue and the occasional bit of score.

Extras: Deleted scenes and a gag reel. This would have been a great series for audio commentaries, but oh well.

Final Thoughts: This is probably the weakest season of the series due to the move towards the classroom halfway through the season that doesn't work. Still, the front half and the last few episodes are enjoyable, especially the sweet finale. Recommended.


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