Escape From the Bronx
Blue Underground // R // $29.98 // June 30, 2015
Review by Kurt Dahlke | posted June 30, 2015
R E P L A Y
A D V I C E
Recommended
E - M A I L
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R E V I E W S
Graphical Version
Escape From The Bronx:
In 1990, The Bronx was a lawless wasteland. By the time Enzo G. Castellari brings about a sequel to The Bronx Warriors, and The New Barbarians, it's time to simply Escape From The Bronx. (Castellari was smart enough to reserve this title for his Escape From New York homages for the final sequel in his 'Bronx Warriors' trilogy.) This action-packed sequel certainly works on its own as a fine example of an Italian exploitation cash-in extravaganza, and while it's not as bloody as its predecessors, it marks a very fun time for connoisseurs of trashy cinema.

Speaking of Trash, he's still kicking it in The Bronx, riding around alone, and bemoaning what's happened to his beloved wasteland, while making a living selling guns. Meanwhile, General Construction Corporation has plans underway to turn the Bronx into a shiny new super-city, with plenty of business opportunities for the 1%, if you will. Evictions in the form of blow-torching hobos to death are in effect, and it's a sorry scene to be sure.

Trash once again determines to ride to the rescue. Joined by street-fighting pals Dablone (Antonio Sabato) and Strike, (Giancarlo Prete). Trash goes straight to the top, kidnapping the president of the Evil Corporation in an effort to force it out of his beloved, crime-soaked borough.

It's not likely you're approaching this movie with an eye to deconstruct the plot, though, are you? Luckily, Castellari wasn't exactly approaching this movie with an eye for constructing the plot, either. What he, you, and I want is plenty of action, which is provided like a bowl of never-ending bread sticks (when you watch, you're family). Trash and friends mow down the bad guys with aplomb, shooting, smashing, and doing whatever they can to kill hundreds of people. And then there are those flame-throwers. Yes, you get your money's worth in the mayhem department, even if that mayhem isn't shown in extremely graphic detail.

Escape From The Bronx, like its predecessors 1990: The Bronx Warriors and The New Barbarians, is a criminal amount of fun without any real brains to slow you down. That first movie in the nominal trilogy was an homage to others, while this one stands firmly on its own as pure genre exploitation. Fights galore, silly and questionable choices of grace notes, and a breathless pace will satisfy your mindless violence itch, even without a ton of blood and gore. Blue Underground ladles on some nice extras for your time as well, meaning this movie is Recommended for a certain type of movie fan, and you know who you are.

The DVD

Video:
Escape into a 2.35:1 ratio, 1080P MPEG4 AVC Encoded transfer that looks OK for such a hoary film. The budget was low, and it shows, film grain is readily apparent, and in some instances glaringly so. Damage to the print is kept to a minimum, but at times the image is a little soft. Details are decent in the foreground, but as may be expected flee the scene the farther into the mid and background you venture. Colors pop, and black levels are mostly OK as well. This doesn't look as good as 1990: The Bronx Warriors does, but it is still pretty nice for an old cheapie.

Sound:
The DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 Mono track fares well. Explosions, gunshots, punches and what have you are resonant and loud. Dubbed dialog is mixed in well, though not always with atmospheric fidelity, and is clear, understandable and free of damage. The soundtrack sounds great as well. Should we have gotten a 5.1 or greater remix? Maybe, but this track pleases my old school sensibilities anyway.

Extras:
A moderated Director's Commentary Track is lively and quite fun, while being nicely informative. Thirteen minutes of Enzo G. Castellari and Fabrizio De Angelis In Conversation represents part three of the whole entertaining dialog, and is crammed with information. But if you want to hear everything they have to say, you'll need to buy those two other Blu-rays. The Hunt For Trash takes 13 minutes to tell the tale of Bronx Warriors superfan Lance Manley and his quest to track down the reclusive former exploitation star. It's fun and funny, but if Trash don't wanna be found, best not go looking for him! Theatrical Trailers, Poster and Stills Galleries plus English SDH, French and Spanish Subtitles round out the package. (I reckon you could call the additional DVD Edition of the whole shebang an extra, too.)

Final Thoughts:
Escape From The Bronx, like its predecessors 1990: The Bronx Warriors and The New Barbarians, is a criminal amount of fun without any real brains to slow you down. That first movie in the nominal trilogy was an homage to others, while this one stands firmly on its own as pure genre exploitation. Fights galore, silly and questionable choices of grace notes, and a breathless pace will satisfy your mindless violence itch, even without a ton of blood and gore. Blue Underground ladles on some nice extras for your time as well, meaning this movie is Recommended for a certain type of movie fan, and you know who you are.



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