The Twilight Zone: The Complete Series
Paramount // Unrated // $126.99 // December 13, 2016
Review by Ian Jane | posted December 22, 2016
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R E V I E W S
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The Series:

"There is a fifth dimension, beyond that which is known to man. It is a dimension as vast as space, and as timeless as infinity. It is the middle ground between light and shadow, and it lies between the pit of man's fears and the summit of his knowledge. This is the dimension of imagination. It is an area which we call… The Twilight Zone."

Some of us still get chills when we hear that. Originally running on CBS from 1959 through 1964, The Twilight Zone has rightly gone on to be recognized as one of the most influential television series in the history of the medium. While genre fare wasn't especially new on TV by this point, what made The Twilight Zone unique was that week after week, viewers really didn't know what they were going to get. It might be a mystery, it might be a science fiction episode, it could be a horror story or it could be a comedy with an odd twist. In the hands of series creator Rod Serling, anything went! What really linked all of the episodes more than anything else, was the fact that they were always a little quirky and always a little odd. Even when the original series went off the air it proved a popular show in syndication, building a large following that exists to this day.

As this was an anthology series, which each episode telling a self-contained story, there's no continuity to discuss, so let's go season by season and talk about some of the highlights.

Season One:

The series starts off strong with Where Is Everybody?, an episode where Earl Holliman seems to have lost his memory and has no recollection of how he got to the seemingly empty town he now finds himself in. The Sixteen Millimeter Shrine also stands out as it finds Ida Lupino cast as an actress well past her prime hoping to regain some of her youthful magic by revisiting some of her old pictures. In Escape Clause we see a man sell his soul to the Devil himself for a chance at immortality while in one of the series' highlights, Time Enough At Last, a man played by Burgess Meredith survives a nuclear holocaust and is thankful for all the time he'll have to read now that the world is more or less over with. In And When The Sky Was Opened three astronauts played by Rod Taylor, Charles Aidman and Jim Hutton crash in the desert with no memory of what happened to get them there. Third From The Sun is one of a few episodes to deal with the nation's fear of a nuclear war as it tells us how a scientist played Fritz Weaver and his assistant played by Joe Maross try to get their families to safety by loading them on a space ship they intend to pilot to another planet. In The Hitch-hiker a woman played by Inger Stevens is on a road trip when she keep coming across the same hitch-hiker played by Leonard Strong. In Mirror Image a woman played by Vera Miles is confused when she keeps being recognized by strangers until she finds out she has a doppelganger. In A Passage For Trumpet a trumpet player played by Jack Klugman attempts to kill himself only to get a new lease on life. The season closes with A World Of His Own where a playwright played by Keenan Wynn discovers that if he describes things to his tape recorder he can make them appear in the real world.

Season Two:

"You're traveling through another dimension. A dimension not only of sight and sound but of mind. A journey into a wondrous land whose boundaries are that of imagination. That's the signpost up ahead. Your next stop… The Twilight Zone."

New credits and the introduction of the iconic theme song starts this second season. The opener was The King Will Not Return, a story where Robert Cummings played a WWII bomber pilot who survived a crash but cannot find his crew. More fun is The Man In A Bottle where Joseph Ruskin plays a genie who gives a pawnbroker played by Luther Adler and his wife played by Vivi Janiss four wishes. A Thing About Machines provides a startling glimpse into the future when Richard Hadyn plays a writer who believes that the machinations of the world are out to get him. The devil makes a return appearance, this time in the form of a prisoner played by Robert Hughes in The Howling Man where two monks, John Carradine and Frederic Ledebur, hold him captive. Eye Of The Beholder sees Maxine Stuart as a woman who undergoes facial surgery to improve her looks and features one of the best shock endings of the entire run. Nick Of Time is another classic where William Shatner and his wife, Patricia Breslin, stop at a diner where he becomes obsessed with a fortune telling machine while in A Most Unusual Camera two thieves, Fred Clark and Jean Carson, steal a camera and find out that its photographs predict the future. The Invaders sees Agnes Moorehead play a woman who lives alone in the middle of nowhere in a house plagued by tiny aliens while Burgess Meredith returns in Mr. Dingle, The Strong playing the unlikeliest of strongmen when he runs into some Martians. In Long Distance Call a boy played by Bill Mumy talks to his deceased grandmother on a toy telephone. Meredith shows up again in The Obsolete Man playing a librarian in the future who is declared obsolete by the Chancellor, placed by Fritz Weaver, and therefore sent off to be executed.

Season Three:

Two opens up the third season where Charles Bronson and Elizabeth Montgomery play two of the four survivors of a war. The other two survivors? Enemies! What to do? War and the effects of war are, as mentioned, recurring themes throughout this show making them all the more timely in the current political climate. In The Arrival Harold Stone plays an aviation official who investigates the scene when airplane lands at the airport without a single passenger or crew member aboard. A Game Of Pool sees a dead pool shark played by Johnathan Winters return from the grave to beat a challenger played by Jack Klugman, with the challenger's life hanging in the balance. Peter Falk plays the dictator of a banana republic who can see his enemies faces in the mirror in the episode of the same name, while in the classic It's A Good Life Bill Mumy returns, this time as a small boy with strange powers running amuck in a small Midwestern town. Once Upon A Time casts Buster Keaton as a janitor who is able to travel through time courtesy of a helmet he comes across, while in A Quality Of Mercy Dean Stockwell plays an army man in the Second World War who winds up seeing the events from through the eyes of the enemy forces. Deadman's Shoes sees a homeless man played by Warren Stevens get more than he bargained for when he pilfers a dead man's shoes. To Serve Man casts Richard Kiel as a remarkably tall alien, one of a few sent from outer space to save the planet from disease while in The Little People we see Claude Akins and Joe Maross play astronauts who get stranded on a distant planet only to find one of them looked upon as a god by its tiny inhabitants. Cliff Robertson plays a ventriloquist whose dummy seems to be taking over his life in The Dummy while in The Changing Of The Guard we see Donald Pleasance play an aging professor who considers suicide until he's confronted by the ghost of a former student.

Season Four:

"You unlock this door with the key of imagination. Beyond it is another dimension. A dimension of sound. A dimension of sight. A dimension of mind. You're moving into a land of both shadow and substance, of things and ideas. You've just crossed over into… The Twilight Zone."

New opening credits graphics, a slightly different intro and a switch from the half hour format to an hour long format make this fourth season stand out from the first three. We also see a decrease in the number of episodes that would debut as part of the fourth season. Regardless, there's still a lot of great material here, starting with the opener In His Image where a man struggles with his urge to kill and the loss of his memory. In He's Alive a very young looking Dennis Hopper plays the leader of some Neo-Nazi's who winds up taking advice from a stranger played by Curt Conway. Mute stars Ann Jillian as a telepathic girl who cannot speak but who has gained powers since a fire killed her parents. Miniature casts Robert Duvall as a shy man who works as a clerk that one day sees a museum's collection of miniatures come to life, while in Printer's Devil Burgess Meredith makes a return appearance as an odd man who is able to report on disasters before they happen for newspaper man Robert Sterling. The New Exhibit casts Robert Balsam as the manager of a wax museum who is fired, but takes the figures of five famous murderers with him in hopes of exacting his revenge. In The Bard we see John Williams play Shakespeare himself when his ghost is conjured up for help by a television writer played by Jack Weston.

Season Five:

The fifth and final season of the series, generally considered the weakest, still has some legitimate gems in the mix. It also saw the show return to the half hour format and get bumped back up to thirty-six episodes. We start off with In Praise Of Pip where Jack Klugman is a bookie who will do anything he can to help when he learns that his son, the titular Pip played by Bobby Diamond, has been wounded serving overseas. Steel sees the great Lee Marvin play a fight promoter try to get rich quick off of a robot pugilist, while in the classic Nightmare At 20,000 Feet Shatner comes back to play an airline passenger who is convinced he can see a horrifying creature latched on to the wing of the plane. Living Doll is another classic wherein Telly Savalas plays a man who finds himself tormented by his step-daughter's new doll, Talky Tina.In The Seventh Is Made Up Of Phantomas Ron Foster, Randy Boone and Warren Oates play a trio of modern day soldiers that wind up getting involved in Custard's Last Stand while in The Long Morrow an astronaut played by Robert Lansing falls head over heels for pretty Mariette Hartley just before he's to spend the next four decades on an outer space mission. Black Leather Jackets casts Lee Kinsolving, Michael Forest and Tom Gilleran as motorcycle toughs that are actually aliens intent on taking over the planet while I Am The Night, Color Me Black sees a man sentenced to hang come sunrise in a town that sees the town stuck in perpetual nighttime. Caesar And Me sees Jackie Cooper play a ventriloquist whose dummy talks him into going on a crime spree while Martin Landau pops up in The Jeopardy Room as a politican marked by a hitman after he defects. In The Encounter a WWII vet played by Neville Brand gets into a fight with a Japanese/American played by George Takai over a samurai sword while the final episode of the series, The Bewitchin' Pool, see two kids get away from their constantly squabbling parents by using their swimming pool to take a very strange journey indeed.

What really makes The Twilight Zone work as well as it does is the writing. While Serling wrote most of the scripts himself, either from original ideas or as adaptations, the series also featured contributions from the likes of Charles Beaumont, Ray Bradbury and Richard Matheson, each a heavyweight in his field. The stories are literate, humorous, frequently highbrow and almost always interesting. Creepy dolls, the horrors of war and human combat, man's obsession with prolonging life and aliens are all frequently dealt with here, as are advancements in technology and time travel. Lots of weird ideas and strange twists keep the show interesting and the writing team really do deserve a whole lot of credit for keeping the five year run of the show as fresh and exciting as it was.

The Twilight Zone also featured some interesting cast members throughout its run. Throughout the five seasons of the show you can look for appearances from Art Carney, Jack Elam, Buster Keaton, Kevin McCarthy, Burgess Meredith, Agnes Moorehead, Richard Conte, Ed Wynn, Bill Bixby, Vera Miles, Charles Bronson, Robert Duvall, Anne Francis, Ida Lupino, Mariette Hartley, Dennis Hopper, Ron Howard, Elizabeth Montgomery, Warren Oates, Telly Savalas, Kevin McCarthy, John Carradine, Roddy McDowell, Leonard Nimoy, Robert Redford, Burt Reynolds, Donald Pleasance, Carol Burnett, Don Rickles, William Shatner, Telly Savalas, George Takei, Robert Duvall, Lee Van Cleef, Lee Marvin and plenty more. Some of these actors were well established at the time of their respective episode's original broadcast date, others were just starting out and prove themselves with their work here but typically speaking the acting in the series is just as good as the writing or the production values.

Note: aside from the packaging changes, this set appears to be identical the Image Entertainment release from 2010. The audio, video and extra features all seem to be the exact same and there's even an Image Entertainment logo that plays before the main menus load.

The Blu-ray:

Video:

The Twilight Zone: The Complete Series is presented on Blu-ray in AVC encoded 1080p high definition in its original 1.33.1 fullframe aspect ratio. Scanned from the original 35mm negatives except for the six episodes of the second season that were shot on video tape. Obviously those aren't taken from negatives but presumably from master tapes and are presented upscaled to 1080i high definition. They look about as good as they probably can, but don't compete with the episodes sourced from film elements. Those transfers look fantastic. Could new scans have brought out more detail? Maybe, but what's here really is impressive. Blacks are nice and deep while whites and greys are reproduced with no problems. Contrast typically looks spot on and detail is generally very impressive indeed. We get very nice texture and depth to the image and very little in the way of actual print damage outside of the occasional small white speck. Grain appears naturally throughout, never clumping up but instead looking very film-like, while the transfers are always free of any obvious noise reduction or edge enhancement. If you look really hard you might spot some mild banding in a few darker scenes here and there, but otherwise? This material looks great.

Sound:

There are two LPCM Mono options available here, the ‘original' and ‘remastered' versions. Optional closed captioning is provided in English only. The discs default to the remastered versions but it's interesting to switch back and forth between the two options. The remastered tracks sound cleaner and have a bit more depth to them, while the original tracks by comparison do sound a little bit flat, but also more authentic. Having said that, the original tracks do have some minor hiss present throughout and the dialogue isn't quite as clear. Regardless of which option you go for the tracks are well balanced. The series' use of music gets a nice boost here too thanks to the lossless audio.

Extras:

Extras are spread across the set as follows and many of them are episode specific:

Season One:

Where Is Everybody?
-commentary by Earl Holliman
-isolated score (by Bernard Hermann)
-sponsor billboard
-radio drama version starring John Schneider
-original pilot version: This thirty-five minute alternate version includes Rod Serling's pitch, it's an interesting variant with different opening and closing narration.
-Rod Serling Lecture At Sherwood Oaks College: this is an audio recording of a 1975 lecture that Serling delivered that is available to listen to over the episode as an alternate audio track. This is spread out throughout the set in different parts.

One For The Angels
-commentary by Gary Gerani
-interview with Dana Dillaway: a six minute piece featuring this episode's leading lady talking about her work on two episodes of The Twilight Zone
-isolated score
-sponsor billboard
-radio drama versions starring Ed Begley Jr

Mr. Denton on Doomsday
-commentary by Martin Landau
-isolated score
-sponsor billboard

The Sixteen-Millimeter Shrine
-isolated score
--sponsor billboards

Walking Distance
-commentary by Marc Scott Zicree
-commentary by Steven C. Smith, John Morgan, William T. Stromberg
-Rod Serling Lecture at Sherwood Oaks College
-alternate audio mix
-isolated score
-radio drama starring Chelcie Ross

Escape Clause
-isolated score
-radio drama starring Mike Star

The Lonely
-commentary by Marc Scott Zicree
-commentary by Steven C. Smith, John Morgan, William T. Stromberg
-commentary by Gary Gerani
-isolated score
-sponsor billboard
-radio drama starring Mike Starr

Time Enough at Last
-commentary by Marc Scott Zicree
-interview Burgess Meredith: a vintagae interview from 1978
-radio drama starring Tim Kazurinsky

Perchance To Dream
-interview with Suzanne Lloyd: in this ten minute piece Lloyd talks about how exciting it was to work on the series and her enthusiasm for the material
-isolated score
-radio drama starring Fred Willard

And When The Sky Was Opened
-commentary by Rod Taylor
-interview Douglas Heyes: a vintage interview from 1978
Rod Serling Lecture at Sherwood Oaks College
-isolated score

What You Need
Tales of Tomorrow Episode: "What You Need"
-isolated score

The Four of Us are Dying
-interview with Beverly Garland: A seven minute interview where the actress talks about her experiences working on the show and what it was like getting into character for this episode.
-commentary by Gary Gerani
-isolated score

Third from the Sun
-commentary by David Simkins and Mar Scott Zicree
-interview Richard L. Bare: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score

I Shot an Arrow Into the Air
-isolated score
-radio drama starring Chelcie Ross

The Hitch-Hiker
-commentary by Marc Scott Zicree
-isolated score
-radio drama starring Kate Jackson

The Fever
-isolated score
-radio drama starring Stacy Keach and Kathy Garver

The Last Flight
-isolated score
-radio drama starring Charles Shaughnessy

The Purple Testament
-commentary by William Reynolds
-interview with Ron Masak: a five minute piece where the actor talks about doing live theater before moving on to star in the show
-isolated score

Elegy
-isolated score

Mirror Image
-commentary by Martin Milner
-isolated score
-radio drama starring Morgan Brittany and Frank John Hughes

The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street
-commentary by Marc Scott Zicree
-isolated score
-radio drama starring Frank John Hughes

A World of Difference
-commentary by Director Ted Post
-isolated score

Long Live Walter Jameson
-commentary by Kevin McCarthy
-commentary by Gary Gerani
-isolated score
-radio drama starring Lou Diamond Phillips

People are Alike All Over
-isolated score
-radio drama starring Blair Underwood

Execution
-isolated score

The Big Tall Wish
-isolated score
-radio drama starring Blair Underwood

A Nice Place to Visit
-isolated score

Nightmare as a Child
-isolated score

A Stop At Willoughby
-commentary by Gary Gerani
-interview with Buck Houghton: a vintage interview from 1978
1977 syndication promo
-isolated score

The Chaser
-interview with Douglas Heyes: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score

A Passage for Trumpet
-commentary by Mark Fergus and Marc Scott Zicree
-commentary by Gary Gerani
-isolated score

Mr. Bevis
-isolated score

The After Hours
-commentary by Marc Scott Zicree
-interview with Anne Francis/Douglas Heyes: a vintage interview from 1978
1977 syndication promo
-isolated score
-radio drama starring Kim Fields

The Mighty Casey
-Rod Serling Lecture at Sherwood Oaks College (1975)
-isolated score
-radio drama starring Paul Dooley

A World of His Own
-interview with Richard Matheson: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score

Season One Bonus Features:
-Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse episode The Time Element. This is a fifty-three minutes piece that is presented with an optional commentary by Marc Scott Zicree. Accompanying it are syndication opening and closing bits.
-interview with George Clemens Part 1: a vintage interview from 1978
-Emmy Awards: this is three minutes of footage from an Emmy Awards show that features Serling giving an acceptance speech after winning an award.

Season 2

King Nine Will Not Return
-commentary by Martin Grams, Jr.
-interview with Buzz Kulik: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
--sponsor billboards

The Man in the Bottle
-interview with Joseph Ruskin: this fourteen minute segment finds the actor talking up the work he did on the episodes he worked on as well as his performances in Naked City.
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Ed Begley Jr.

Nervous Man in a Four Dollar Room
-commentary by Gary Gerani
-commentary by Scott Skelton and Jim Benson
-interview with Douglas Heyes: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Adam Baldwin

A Thing About Machines
-commentary by Len Wein and Marc Scott Zicree
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

The Howling Man
-interview with H.M. Wynant: this is a thirteen minute interview with the actor who is quite proud of its enduring popularity amongst fans of the series.
-commentary by Gary Gerani
-interview with David Heyes: a vintage interview from 1978
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Fred Willard

Eye of the Beholder
-commentary by Donna Douglas
-commentary by Joseph Dougherty and Marc Scott Zicree
-commentary by Steven C. Smith and Jon Burlingame
-commentary by Gary Gerani
-interview with Maxine Stuart and Douglas Heyes: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-alternate end titles
-rare color photos
-sponsor billboards

Nick of Time
-commentary by Matthew Weiner and Marc Scott Zicree
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Marshall Allman and Jamie Anne Allman

The Lateness of the Hour
--original production slate
-sponsor billboard
-radio drama starring Jane Seymour and James Keach

The Trouble with Templeton
-interview with Buzz Kulik: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Michael York

A Most Unusual Camera
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

The Night of the Meek
-commentary by Len Wein and Marc Scott Zicree
-commentary by Gary Gerani
-original production slate
-radio drama starring Chris McDonald

Dust
-interview with Douglas Heyes: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

Back There
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Jim Caviezel

The Whole Truth
-original production slate
-radio drama starring Henry Rollins

The Invaders
-commentary by Michael Nankin and Michael Scott Zicree
-commentary by Gary Gerani
-interview with Douglas Heyes: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

A Penny for Your Thoughts
-commentary by George Clayton Johnson and Marc Scott Zicree
-interview with George Clayton Johnson: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

Twenty Two
-isolated score
-original production slate
-sponsor billboard

The Odyssey of Flight 33
-commentary by Gary Gerani
-interview with Robert Serling: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Daniel J. Travanti

Mr. Dingle, The Strong
-commentary by Don Rickles
-commentary by Martin Grams, Jr.
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

Static
-interview with Buzz Kulik: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-original production slate
-radio drama starring Stan Freberg

The Prime Mover
-commentary by George Clayton Johnson and Marc Scott Zicree
-commentary by Martin Grams, Jr.
-isolated score
-sponsor billboard

Long Distance Call
-commentary with Bill Mumy and William Idelson
-original production slate

A Hundred Yards Over the Rim
-commentary by Cliff Roberston
-commentary by Scott Skelton and Jim Benson
-interview with Buzz Kulik: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-sponsor billboard
-radio drama starring Jim Caviezel

The Rip Van Winkle Caper
-commentary by Scott Skelton and Jim Benson
-isolated score
-sponsor billboard

The Silence
-commentary by Marv Wolfman and Marc Scott Zicree
-sponsor billboard
-radio drama starring Chris McDonald

Shadow Play
-commentary by Dennis Weaver
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

The Mind and the Matter
-commentary by Shelley Berman
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

Will the Real Martian Please Stand Up?
-commentary by Marc Scott Zicree
-commentary by Gary Gerani
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Richard Kind

The Obsolete Man
-commentary by Matthew Weiner and Marc Scott Zicree
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Jason Alexander

Season Three:

Two
-commentary by Scott Skelton and Jim Benson
-Rod Serling teaser
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Don Johnson

The Arrival
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Blair Underwood

The Shelter
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Ernie Hudson

The Passerby
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Morgan Brittany

A Game Of Pool
-commentary by Jonathan Winters
-commentary by George Clayton Johnson and Marc Scott Zicree
-interview with Buzz Kulik and Buck Houghton: a vintage interview from 1978
Jonathan Winters reads the alternate ending
-1989 remake clip
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

The Mirror
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Tony Plana

The Grave
-commentary by Gary Gerani
-commentary by Martin Grams, Jr.
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Michael Rooker

It's a Good Life
-commentary by Bill Mumy
-commentary by Marv Wolfman and Marc Scott Zicree
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

Deaths-head Revisited
-commentary by Neil Gaiman and Marc Scott Zicree
-interview with Buck Houghton: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring H.M. Wynant

The Midnight Sun
-commentary by Lois Nettleton
-commentary by Gary Gerani
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

Still Valley
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Adam West

The Jungle
-commentary by William F. Nolan, John Tomerlin and Marc Scott Zicree
-commentary by Scott Skelton and Jim Benson
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Ed Begley, Jr.

Once Upon a Time
-commentary by Martin Grams, Jr.
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

Five Characters in Search of an Exit
-commentary by William Windom
-interview with Lamont Johnson: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Jason Alexander

A Quality of Mercy
-commentary by Leonard Nimoy
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

Nothing in the Dark
-commentary by George Clayton Johnson and Marc Scott Zicree
-interview with Lamont Johnson and George Clayton Johnson: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

One More Pallbearer
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Chelcie Ross

Dead Man's Shoes
1985 Remake clip: Dead Woman's Shoes
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Bill Smitrovich

The Hunt
-commentary by Earl Hamner and Marc Scott Zicree
-interview with Earl Hamner: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-sponsor billboard

Showdown with Rance McGrew
-commentary by Robert Cornthwaite
Isoalted Score
-sponsor billboards

Kick the Can
-commentary by George Clayton Johnson and Marc Scott Zicree
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Shelley Berman and Stan Freberg

A Piano in the House
-commentary by Scott Skelton and Jim Benson
-interview with Buck Houghton and Earl Hamner: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-radio drama starring Michael York

The Last Rites of Jeff Myrtlebank
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

To Serve Man
-commentary by Jeff Vlaming and Marc Scott Zicree
-interview with Richard L. Bare: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Blair Underwood

The Fugitive
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

Little Girl Lost
-commentary by Mark Fergus and Marc Scott Zicree
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

Person or Persons Unknown
-isolated score
-sponsor billboard

The Little People
-interview with Buck Houghton: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

Four O'Clock
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Stan Freberg

Hocus-Pocus and Frisby
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

The Trade-Ins
-interview with Edson Stroll: this seven minute piece lets the actor discuss the two episodes he appeared in and talk about why he feels the show was so unique and culturally important.
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring H.M. Wynant and Peggy Webber

The Gift
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

The Dummy
-commentary by Cliff Robertson
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Bruno Kirby

Young Man's Fancy
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

I Sing the Body Electric
-commentary by Marc Scott Zicree
-interview with Buck Houghton: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

Cavender is Coming
Original Laugh Track
-commentary by Martin Grams, Jr.
-isolated score
-The Garry Moore Show clip: a nine minute segment that is a comedy sketch spookring the show and featuring Serling himself.

The Changing of the Guard
-commentary by Len Wein and Marc Scott Zicree
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Orson Bean

Season Three Bonus Features:
-Liars Club: a twenty-one minute episode of a game show that Serling guest hosted that also stars none other than Bettie White.
-Tell It To Groucho clip: a fifteen minute piece with Serling doing a guest spot on the talk show where he interacts with Groucho Marx.
-The Famous Writers School promo
-interview with George T. Clemens: a vintage interview from 1978

Season Four:

In His Image
-commentary by Marc Scott Zicree
-interview with Herbert Hirschman: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

The Thirty Fathom Grave
-commentary by Gary Gerani and Marc Scott Zicree
-isolated score
-sponsor billboard (HD, :16)
-radio drama starring Blair Underwood

Valley of the Shadow
-interview with Morgan Brittany: a seven minute interview where this episode's leading lady talks about this and the two other episodes that she starred in.
-commentary by Jaime Paglia and Marc Scott Zicree
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

He's Alive
-Rod Serling blooper
-isolated score
-sponsor billboard

Mute
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

Death Ship
-commentary by Marc Scott Zicree
-interview with Ross Martin: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

Jess-Belle
-interview with Anne Francis: an eight minute interview where she shares her thoughts on this episode and on her interactions with Serling.
-commentary by Earl Hamner and Marc Scott Zicree
-interview with Earl Hamner, Buzz Kulik, Anne Francis: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

Miniature
-commentary by William Windom
-commentary by William F. Nolan and Marc Scott Zicree
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

Printer's Devil
-commentary by Bill Warren and Marc Scott Zicree
-interview with Burgess Meredith: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

No Time Like the Past
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Jason Alexander

The Parallel
-interview with Paul Comi: an eight minute piece where Comi shares memories of the various episodes that he appeared in and on Serling.
-commentary by Marc Scott Zicree
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Lou Diamond Phillips

I Dream of Genie
-interview with John Furia, Jr.: A nine minute interview with the man who wrote this episode on some of the story ideas and collaborating with Serling on the episode.
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

The New Exhibit
-commentary by Bill Warren and Marc Scott Zicree
-commentary by Scott Skelton and Jim Benson
-isolated score
-sponsor billboard

Of Late I Think of Cliffordville
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring H.M. Wynant

The Incredible World of Horace Ford
-commentary by Jeff Vlaming and Marc Scott Zicree
-interview with Pat Hingle: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-radio drama starring Mike Starr

On Thursday We Leave for Home
-commentary by Joseph Dougherty and Marc Scott Zicree
-commentary by Scott Skelton and Jim Benson
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Barry Bostwick

Passage on the Lady Anne
-isolated score
-sponsor billboard

The Bard
-commentary by Bill Warren and Marc Scott Zicree
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring John Ratzenberger

Season Four Bonus Features:
-Saturday Night Live: a five minute comedy sketch that in which Dan Akroyd portrays Rod Serling.
-Genesee Beer commercial (featuring Rod Serling)
-The Famous Writers School promo
-interview with George T. Clemens: a vintage interview from 1978

Season Five:

In Praise of Pip
-interview with Bill Mumy: a seven minute interview with the actor who talks about starring in a trio of episodes as a child actor.
-commentary by Bill Mumy
-commentary by Neil Gaiman and Marc Scott Zicree
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

Steel
-interview with Richard Matheson: an all too brief interview with the master writer who talks about his thoughts on the show and some of the cast members who performed in it.
-commentary by Bill Warren and Marc Scott Zicree
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Louis Gossett, Jr.

Nightmare at 20,000 Feet
-interview with Richard Matheson: a longer nine minute interview where Matheson goes into detail on what was involved in writing this classic episode.
-commentary by Richard Donner and Marc Scott Zicree
-Rod Serling Lecture at Sherwood Oaks College: a vintage interview from 1978
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

A Kind of Stopwatch
-commentary by Martin Grams, Jr.
-isolated score
-sponsor billboard
-radio drama starring Lou Diamond Phillips

The Last Night of a Jockey
-commentary by Mickey Rooney
-sponsor billboards

Living Doll
-interview with June Foray: a twelve minute interview with the actress talks who talks about what it was like doing the voice work for the Chatty Cathy doll and how this led to other work for her down the road in her career.
-commentary by June Foray
-commentary by George Noory and Marc Scott Zicree
-commentary by Gary Gerani
-isolated score
-radio drama starring Tim Kazurinsky

The Old Man in the Cave
-commentary by Scott Skelton and Jim Benson
-isolated score
-sponsor billboard
-radio drama starring Adam Baldwin

Uncle Simon
-commentary by Martin Grams, Jr.
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Peter Mark Richman and Beverly Garland

Probe 7, Over and Out
-commentary by Ted Post and Marc Scott Zicree
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Louis Gossett, Jr.

The 7th is Made Up of Phantoms
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Richard Grieco

A Short Drink from a Certain Fountain
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Adam West

Ninety Years Without Slumbering
-interview with Carolyn Kearney and George Clayton Johnson: a ten minute piece where they talk about working on the pilot episode and then later working on this episode.
-interview with George Clayton Johnson: a separate twenty minute clip from the same interview where George discusses some of the challenges involved in writing for the series.
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Bill Erwin

Ring-a-Ding Girl
-interview with Earl Hamner: a nineteen minute interview where Hamner talks about how he got into writing for television and some specifics as to the multiple episodes her wrote for the series.
-commentary by Scott Skelton and Jim Benson
-sponsor billboards

You Drive
-interview with Earl Hamner: a shorter two minute interview with Hamner where he talks about the specifics of this episode.
-commentary by Scott Skelton and Jim Benson
-sponsor billboards

The Long Morrow
-commentary by Mariette Hartley
-commentary by Scott Skelton and Jim Benson
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Kathy Garver

The Self-Improvement of Salvadore Ross
-commentary by Martin Grams, Jr.
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Luke Perry

Number 12 Looks Just Like You
-commentary by Marc Scott Zicree
-isolated score
-sponsor billboards

Black Leather Jackets
-interview with Michael Forest and Earl Hamner: an eight minute interview with the star and writier of this episode.
-sponsor billboards

Night Call
-interview with Richard Matheson: a quick three minute talk with Matheson about how his short story was turned into one of the best episodes of the season.
-commentary by Michael Nankin and Marc Scott Zicree
-isolated score
-radio drama starring Mariette Hartley

From Agnes With Love
-sponsor billboards
-radio drama starring Ed Begley, Jr.

Spur of the Moment
-interview with Richard Matheson (HD, 13:22)



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