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Reviews » DVD Video Reviews » I Can't Think Straight
I Can't Think Straight
Entertainment One // PG-13 // February 9, 2010
List Price: $24.98 [Buy now and save at Amazon]
Review by Brian Orndorf | posted January 31, 2010 | E-mail the Author
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THE FILM

It's hard not to feel an attack of the yawns with "I Can't Think Straight." After all, it's a fairly routine story of newfound lesbian rapture told with draggy melodrama and general overemphasis. However, the film is cast well with striking actresses Lisa Ray and Sheetal Sheth, who provide some needed emotional buoyancy to an otherwise unsuccessful attempt to merge hazardous sexual identity with turbulent world politics.

Celebrating her fourth marital engagement, indecisive Tala (Lisa Ray, "Water") is growing concerned, facing a dreary life of compromise and expectation ahead of her. Meeting timid writer Leyla (Sheetal Sheth, "Looking for Comedy in the Muslim World") through her family, Tala's senses are opened, and a strong attraction grows between the women as they bond over shared interests in art and breaking family tradition. When this friendship leads to sex, it freaks Tala out and she soon bails on the relationship, pushing Leyla to reveal her desires to the world and live her life free. Tala, firmly entrenched in suffocating wedding plans, now struggles to find the same release of true self she enjoyed in Leyla's presence.

Certainly co-writer/director Shamim Sarif approaches "Straight" from an empathic perspective. The film is nothing if not sensitive to relatable puzzles of the heart and assorted personal matters of sexual preference. It's a standard coming out tale, replete with disapproving parents and constipated professions of love, only the waters are muddied by the presence of geopolitical concerns, centered on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict (the film is billed as "Just Another British, Indian, Muslim, Arab, Christian, Lesbian Romantic Comedy") and how it informs brewing hostility between Leyla and Tala.

The chatter about international relations doesn't smother "Straight," but it's enough of a distraction to wonder what grand plan Sarif had in mind for the persistent subplot. Talk of Middle East politics seems out of place in a lesbian discovery tale, a fact reinforced by the cast, who look as though they're trying to pass kidney stones when the dialogue wanders to the news page. It's a laudable effort to use the pressure of cultural restraints to underline sexual repression, but the message is lost in the mix when "Straight" moves on over to the bedroom games.

Only a fool would consider Sheth and Ray as anything less than an ideal pair of lovers, and the actors provide the film with a loving romantic temperament. Like the rest of the performers, the screenplay fails the leads, with Sarif's direction compounding the headache when the film takes a breakneck turn toward soap opera territory. Still, the actresses are appealing, selling the heat of newfound lust in the face of PG-13 bondage and awful dubbing that encases the entire film in a prison of artificiality (the movie sounds like an Italian horror film from the mid-1970s). Two talents already comfortable together (in Sarif's other film, "The World Unseen"), Sheth and Ray provide just enough allure to the keep "Straight" afloat, albeit in a dilapidated state.

THE DVD

Visual:

The anamorphic widescreen (1.85:1 aspect ratio) presentation for "Straight" lacks a pleasing crispness to enjoy all the sensuality and various locations. Skintones feel unnaturally drained of color, as does the rest of the visual experience, which takes the splendor out of much of the cinematography. Black levels aren't too much trouble, dealing well with night shots and hair textures.

Audio:

The Dolby Digital 5.1 mix is active, but also completely frontal. Party and restaurant sequences allow some atmosphere into the surrounds, but the majority of the track is devoted to the exaggerated dialogue dubbing (everything is perfectly pronounced) and soundtrack selections, which provide a healthy sonic force. While dimension is lacking here, all the audio information is properly delivered without any confusion.

Subtitles:

English SDH subtitles are offered.

Extras:

The feature-length audio commentary with director/co-writer Shamim Sarif is perfectly calm and collected, perhaps too much so. An informative track with a rich exploration of religious, political, and sexual themes, the listening experience is hampered some by Sarif's dry delivery, which doesn't always demand attention. Still, everything about the film (including a little trash-talking about untrustworthy producers) is laid out carefully by the filmmaker with minimal chasms of dead air.

"Behind the Scenes" (24:59) gets into the meat of film production, with cast and crew interviews blended well with on-set footage, showing the camaraderie and the hurried pace of the shoot. Everyone seems exceptionally proud of the film, revealing their high hopes for audience acceptance.

And a Theatrical Trailer has been included.

FINAL THOUGHTS

Passes at comedy, family ruin, and vocational fantasy achievement tend to draw out the 78-minute-long feature longer than it needs to go. Perhaps "I Can't Think Straight" fits a crude cultural need in certain parts of the globe, but overall finesse is absent, making it impossible to appreciate the crucial radiance of self-discovery as idealized in the feature.


For further online adventure, please visit brianorndorf.com
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