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William S. Burroughs: A Man Within

Oscilloscope Laboratories // Unrated // February 15, 2011
List Price: $29.99 [Buy now and save at Amazon]

Review by Casey Burchby | posted March 15, 2011 | E-mail the Author

That William S. Burroughs was one of
the twentieth century's most influential writers is not in much doubt.
His nature - strictly as a man - is a trickier question, and is the
one that Yony Leyser attempts to tackle in his ambitious yet focused
documentary film.




Resisting strict chronology, Leyser breaks up the film thematically,
examining several facets of Burroughs' life in context. This approach
has certain advantages, particularly the fact that it affords the viewers
an opportunity to see how different sides of Burroughs that might seem
to conflict actually mesh in unexpected ways (i.e., his "gentlemanly"
appearance and his love of guns). On the other hand, it deprives us
of the kind of simple but useful context allowed by chronological presentation;
people grow over time, and sometimes it's hard to see how Burroughs
changes.



Leyser looks at Burroughs first and foremost as a homosexual. He does
this in spite of Burroughs' own resistance of labels and easy categorization.
But Burroughs' homosexuality was a fact, and Leyser does his best to
investigate what this meant to a man who was notoriously difficult when
it came to his emotional life. The voices of some of his companions
help fill out a portrait of a quietly loving man who kept his feelings
largely to himself, but whose actions could bear deep affection.




Burroughs the writer is also here. Leyser examines Burroughs' ideas,
although not in as much detail as I would have preferred. This is the
side of Burroughs I am most interested in. Burroughs' cut-up technique
is described, although it's a well-known story among his fans. His struggles
with censorship - particularly in the case of "Naked Lunch"
- are also recounted. More emphasis on process and practice would have
been enlightening.



But Leyser is more interested in Burroughs' private life, and there
are plentiful excerpts from home movies and private video footage, along
with anecdotes from Patti Smith, John Waters, Peter Weller, Thurston
Moore, Jello Biafra, and many others. Of particular interest are archival
interviews and home footage of Burroughs with Allen Ginsburg.




On balance, Leyser has selected a difficult subject, and does a fine
job of outlining the man's difficult-to-access inner life. While discussion
of Burroughs the writer is limited, Leyser's film is a sensitive exploration
of a layered life.





The DVD



Image and Sound

Oscilloscope Laboratories presents the feature in an enhanced transfer
that looks good but not great. The image is solid as far as compression
goes, but it's somewhat weak in terms of color and contrast. This is
perplexing given the movie's newness. The stereo soundtrack is good,
with music often a powerful presence. Where archival footage is in need
of subtitling, it has been provided.




Bonus Content

There are a handful of interesting bonus features. First off are
a group of three short Deleted Scenes. Home Movies feature
latter-day Burroughs at home with friends, hooting, hollering, and drinking.
Shotgun Art
consists of home footage of Burroughs demonstrating
his own peculiar method of painting. Sonic Youth Visit documents
the band's 1995 visit to Burroughs' Lawrence, KS, home. Naked Lunch
50th Anniversary
compiles footage from an event that seemed to be
as much about the David Cronenberg movie as Burroughs' book. There's
also a nice Q&A with Director
Yony Leyser
from the 2010 BFI Film Festival.






Final Thoughts



Despite its focus on his inner life as opposed to his work, fans of
William S. Burroughs will eat up this thoughtful, searching documentary.
Recommended
.

Casey Burchby lives in Northern California: Twitter, Tumblr.

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