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Hilda Crane

Other // Unrated // May 22, 2018 // Region 0
List Price: $29.95 [Buy now and save at Twilighttimemovies]

Review by Neil Lumbard | posted July 22, 2018 | E-mail the Author



http-equiv="content-type">
Hilda Crane Twilight Time Blu-ray Review


Hilda Crane is
a dramatic film
produced by Herbert B. Swope Jr. (The Bravados). The
film
stars Jean Simmons as Hilda Crane: a woman in her late twenties who
has been divorced twice and is getting proposals by other men for
marriage. Hilda is thought of as having had a "checkered past" by
her acquaintances and others because of her multiple previous
marriages and relationships.


However, the reality is
that Hilda
Crane just wants to have a normal relationship and to settle down but
the societal judgments on her puts her in a difficult situation.
Hilda moves back in with her mother and tries to start her life over
again. Her mom introduces her to Russell Burns (Guy Madison), who
runs a successful business as a builder.


Although Hilda doesn't love
him she
wants to try and have a normal relationship. She soon finds that
Russell's mother, Mrs. Burns (Evelyn Varden) won't allow her to be
involved with her son without a fight: Mrs. Burns constantly puts up
a mean-spirited front with Hilda as she views her as having been
around-the-block with too many men. It causes a rift that provokes
high emotions.


The film feels extremely
dated in
today's modern world. In fact, it's quite grating how judgmental so
many of the film's characters are towards Hilda. In today's modern
age and society, divorce rates are high. It is a fact that many
marriages end in divorce. Not every marriage ends up working out. The
subject is one which would have been considered more difficult to
discuss in the 1950's but in our society today you can actually hear
the story creaking with it's dated material. The view of Hilda as if
she's a "cortisan" is downright absurd. Characters repeatedly
leap to judge her in the film and all Hilda wants is a fresh start.


From a technical
standpoint, the film
is not a terrible effort. The cinematography by Joseph MacDonald (The
Young Lions
, The Sand Pebbles) is
certainly effective and
manages to make the film slightly more bearable. The CinemaScope
photography is effective and polished. The music score by David
Raksin (Laura) is also a highlight and carries with
it an
almost film-noir style at times. The costume designs done by Charles
Le Maire (All About Eve, The Day the Earth
Stood Still
)
are also well done.


Written and directed by
Philip Dunne
(Blue Denim, which I also href="https://www.dvdtalk.com/reviews/73055/blue-denim/">reviewed),
based on a play by Samson Raphaelson (Suspicion), Hilda
Crane
isn't as effective a film as it wants to be. Although
the
film seems to actually be trying to make a more positive statement
about the title character by the conclusion, the extremely dated
nature of the storytelling makes it often unbearable. The film isn't
terrible from any production aesthetic standpoint but the
storytelling is disappointing to say the least. The film is so
extremely dated that it positively grates on one's nerves.


The Blu-ray:




Video:


The film is presented on Blu-ray with a 1080p MPEG-4 AVC
encoded
high definition presentation. This is an impressive presentation with
good overall clarity and depth to the image. The technicolor
photography impresses. This 35mm CinemaScope film is presented in the
original theatrical aspect ratio of 2.35:1 widescreen. It's an
admirable presentation of the film which looks impressive on the
format.


Audio:


The audio is presented in both 5.1 and 2.0 DTS-HD Master
Audio.
The stereo audio preserves the original sound design while the
surround sound opens up the audio slightly for the score to be more
enveloping. English SDH subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing
are provided.




Extras:


Booklet featuring an essay by Twilight Time's Julie Kirgo


Isolated Music Score Track


Jean Simmons: Picture Perfect Biography A&E
Documentary

(SD, 44 min.) explores the life and career of the film's star


Theatrical
Trailer


Final Thoughts:


Hilda
Crane

is a underwhelming film with a dated sensibility. Though the
filmmaking has decent production work behind-the-scenes, the
storytelling feels positively ancient. Twilight Time's Blu-ray
release, on the other hand, is superb. Twilight Time again
demonstrates their commitment to preserving film's and presenting
them with high quality presentations.


Skip It.



Neil Lumbard is a lifelong fan of cinema. He aspires to make movies and has written two screenplays on spec. He loves writing, and currently does in Texas.


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