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Dog Doc: Special Edition, The

MVD Entertainment Group // Unrated // October 13, 2020
List Price: $13.46 [Buy now and save at Amazon]

Review by Ryan Keefer | posted February 22, 2021 | E-mail the Author
The Movie:

The births (and deaths) of family members close to me over the last few years have had me on a road about integrative treatment that I was not prepared for, but have since accepted for various reasons. Why wouldn't you decide on some out of the box methods to extend a loved one's quality of life? And it is explained in a way that I wish I'd had before in a documentary called The Dog Doc, a movie about a veterinarian. And I have no pets!

The Cindy Meehl project focuses on Marty Goldstein, a doctor in New York who graduated from Cornell and knew treatment from a conventional perspective, but found that holistic treatment helped with his health, and inspired him to direct it to his animal patients, which have been received mostly with success. The feature looks at several patients who come in and out of the hospital he operates. It interviews the owners of the pets, Goldstein, his wife and staff and they discuss their thoughts on integrative treatment and holistic treatments, and Goldstein touches on his desire to be a more visible advocate of it in veterinary medicine.

In seeing a film about a veterinarian who employs some holistic methods of treatment, there are moments where the rational mind comes in; I mean, why would you do cryotherapy for a dog? Makes no sense, right? But Goldstein manages to explain that his approach is less about one philosophy over another, and he feels there are places for both, but when joined together it turns out to prove effective for dog and cat owners who are desperate to save or spend more time with their furry friends.

One of the topics that crystallizes the way Goldstein provides treatment is pet vaccinations. Now, the topic of being pro- or anti-vax is one that makes the respondents and reactions to same become something that grinds teeth and causes stress. Goldstein lays out an argument that should not be construed as anti-vaccinations as he suggests, but one of anti-overmedication, and even providing alternative options for them. It is not using a component of the treatment as a touchstone, but as a tool, which is something that we would all strive for, right? When you see a pet in the film (and you see a few) who come to Goldstein on death's door, and they manage to survive two, five, ten years or more, would you rather have that time, or not?

Overall, The Dog Doc proves to show us things not just about a longtime New York veterinarian, but also on treatment and approaches in general that not just creatures with four legs should be considering. It does not suggesting lighting incense or rubbing oils, just that the chance for employing both schools of thought is something that should be effective and available for all. And that's what we all want right?

The Video:

1.78:1 widescreen for this production with is a combination of handheld and sitdown pieces, which also capture dated stills and news footage. The modern footage looks good, with colors and fleshtones reproduced nicely and black levels appearing natural. It looks like what you would expect it to look.

The Sound:

DTS-HD MA 5.1 surround for the film, but it doesn't have a lot to do for the feature given that it's a documentary on a very real person. The score sounds good and dialogue is well-balanced in the middle of the home theater, and given the nature of the source material, the Blu-ray is loyal and workmanlike, nothing surprising here.

Extras:

What's here appears to be ample; nine deleted scenes (37:54) cover Goldstein's demeanor, his staff and other facets of his treatment and of the hospital he operates. There is a stills gallery and a trailer (1:58) as well.

Final Thoughts:

The Dog Doc shows us the potential of treatment for the sake of treating the patient and/or improving the quality of life, which are tenets that most practitioners should include as part of their approach whether the patient chews on rawhide or eggs. Technically, the disc is fine and the supplements are quick and easy, but the topic is such that it keeps you involved and advocate for it whether you have pets or not.

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