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November 30, 2013

Savant's new reviews today are:

Love is a Racket

William A. Wellman is the director of this snappy, cynical tale of a Broadway columnist's scrapes with the underworld and a two-faced girlfriend who uses him to further her career. The cast is exciting in itself: Douglas Fairbanks Jr., Ann Dvorak, Frances Dee, Lee Tracy and Lyle Talbot. It's a Pre-code marvel all the way, from the open sexuality to a hero who covers up a crime by tossing a body from atop a skyscraper. From The Warner Archive Collection.
11/30/13

and

The Puppetoon Movie
Blu-ray

Arnold Leibovit's theatrical collection of George Pal Puppetoon short subjects is just the headliner item on this two-disc collection. The 1987 feature contains a number of Puppetoons, but twenty more are included as extras, along with the entire documentary The Fantasy Film Worlds of George Pal, the entire George Pal feature The Great Rupert (in HD) and several unique extras in great quality, like the TV visit to the set of Pal's film Destination Moon. In Blu-ray from B2MP.
11/30/13




Hello!

Gary Teetzel informs me that the word is out that Warner Home Video is going to release George Pal's The Time Machine sometime in 2014 (not 802,701). That sounds like great news, and I really hope they properly time the transfer. The last occasion that I dialed past this movie on TCM, the midnight exterior for New Year's Eve 1999 was playing as if it occurred at High Noon. The old DVD of this show was a vast improvement on TV prints, and there's no reason why a Blu-ray can't look incredible. Gary also hopes that, now that Warners is distributing vintage Blu-rays of Paramount shows, some wonderful development will bring us concurrent BD releases of the Pal Paramount sci-fi pix, mainly When Worlds Collide and The War of the Worlds. Yes, that sounds like a great idea to me.

If web psychology works as it should, the wishful thinking in the previous paragraph will result in a false rumor that the Paramount shows are actually scheduled. This will lead to fan disappointment and anger later on. I'm glad I'm doing my bit, here at DVD Savant.

Dick Dinman has a trio of new Radio Shows over at DVD Classics Corner On The Air, all centering on his interviews with Earl Holliman. This time Dick spreads a celebrities memories over a number of recent releases. Dick Dinman Salutes Earl Holliman comes in three parts -- Part One takes on Holliman's supporting role in Joseph H. Lewis's The Big Combo, Part Two is a discussion of George Stevens' Giant and Part Three sees Holliman remembering his starring role in the very first episode of Rod Serling's The Twilight Zone.

Thanks for reading! Glenn Erickson



November 26, 2013

Savant's new reviews today are:

Mystery Science Theater 3000
25th Anniversary Edition
Collectable Tin

It's a gift box, in a metallic collector tin, of a tall stack of some of the most requested MST3K episodes including Joel Hodgson's last and Michael T. Nelson's first. Comes complete with three exhaustive documentaries, interviews, 'extra bits' and even a docu for one of the movies being presented. The lineup: The Brain that Wouldn't Die, The Day the Earth Froze, Gorgo, The Leech Woman, Mitchell, and Moon Zero Two. From Shout! Factory.
11/26/13

and

The Blue Angel
2-Disc Ultimate Edition

Blu-ray

Marlene Dietrich & Josef von Sternberg'a über-classic is a fantasy vision of Weimar decadence and expressionistic sensuality. Emil Jannings' clueless professor loses everything for love of a woman who considers him little more than a cute amusement; and Dietrich is the vulgar tease who comes off as an irresistable feminine force. With great music by Friedrich Hollaender. This is a 2-Disc Ultimae Edition containing both the German and English language versions. In Blu-ray from Kino Classics.
11/26/13




Hello!

It's pitch time. Not only am I out of reviews -- a new batch of discs arrived just today -- but I was thinking it might be a wise thing in this moment before Thanksgiving to push a couple of books in this space -- my book of two years ago and another I read this year that truly merits the extra bit of attention.

John McElwee's Showmen, Sell it Hot! carries the sub-title "Movies as Merchandise in Golden Era Hollywood," and John has made the historical marketing of film into a serious, well researched investigation of the grand sales pitch as performed by hustlers in the 'teens to studio publicity departments to creative exhibitors across America. The writing style is a pleasure to read, as John's fans over at Greenbriar Picture Shows know well. What's more, this is a classy gift suitable for more than hardcore film folk (bless 'em). A quality hardcover publication on fine paper, Showmen! is awash with beautiful illustrations, photos and actual film ads across the decades. It's a heck of a coffee table book and bound to be appreciated by anyone with an eye for effective commercial graphics, as well as people interested in hearing the strange background stories of the exhibition of some of the most famous films they know, like The Wizard of Oz.

This also gives me an opportunity to plug my more narrowly focused book of 2012, Sci-Fi Savant: Classic Sci-Fi Review Reader. I've kept my banners up because it still sells, and I still get positive feedback from it. The book adapts Savant reviews (and adds a bunch more) into critical essays that detail the history of the Sci-fi film, tracing themes and connecting the dots between the early pictures (with a couple of titles rediscovered in just the last few years), the 1950s classics and the genre since then. It includes the lengthy, noted essays on Invaders from Mars and Until the End of the World. We decided to call it a 'reader' because it didn't need to be taken in all at once. Still available and now seeing better pricing at Amazon.

I keep telling myself that I need to self-promote more, but it still feels strange -- thanks for your indulgence, thanks for reading and Happy Thanksgiving! -- Glenn Erickson



November 23, 2013

Savant's new reviews today are:

La Notte
Blu-ray

The most accessible of Michelangelo Antonioni's 'alienation' quadrilogy movies is about an upscale husband and wife drifting apart. Jeanne Moreau feels neglected and unfulfilled living in the shadow of Marcello Mastroianni, a self-obsessed author. She drifts through the city looking at places from her past and then joins her husband to attend one of those all-night parties at a millionaire's house. Their mutual bitterness results in flirtations with others -- Mastroianni chases his host's daughter, Monica Vitti. A beautiful HD transfer in Blu-ray from The Criterion Collection.
11/23/13

Le joli mai

Chris Marker and Pierre Lhomme follow the 'Direct Cinema' ethos in their inspired 2.5-hour portrait of Paris during a specific month in 1962. The observations and interviews elicit the full range of the French experience with questions as simple as, "are you happy?" and "what worries you?" It's fascinating and beautiful to see, a time machine to a Paris that for the most part is no longer there. In French and English versions, and with an excellent set of extras. A two-disc DVD set from Icarus Films.
11/23/13

and

Jane Eyre
Blu-ray

Charlotte Brontë's classic novel gets its best cinematic version with direction from Robert Stevenson and a confirmed heavy influence by star Orson Welles. The more famous director plays what may be his only romantic lead opposite Joan Fontaine, recycling her wimp from Rebecca and Suspicion with a little more gumption. But the script by Stevenson, John Houseman and Aldous Huxley is excellent, the direction is moody and oppressive, and Bernard Herrmann's "tempestuous" music score one of his best. With a trio of child stars -- Peggy Ann Garner, Margaret O'Brien and an eye-poppingly beautiful moppet named Elizabeth Taylor. In Blu-ray from Twilight Time.
11/23/13




Hello!

Two great trailers went up last week over at Trailers from Hell. Roger Corman comments on his own Ski Troop Attack, a runaway production made in the Dakotas. And Larry Karaszewski provides a commentary for the creepy Come and See, which is said to be one of the greatest war films by virtue of being one of the most unwatchable. Trailers from Hell's weekly newsletter is entertaining in itself; I recommend signing up.

Forbidden personal appeal: I've just become aware of a French Blu-ray of one of my favorite moves from going-on 45 years ago, Henri Verneuil's The Sicilian Clan. This release reportedly carries both the all-English dubbed American version and the superior multi-lingual International version that I saw just once in 1969 or 1970. Do any readers out there have any advice for me, for ordering from Amazon.Fr? Or is there some better source I'm not aware of? Many thanks.

What a great year for discs! Thanks for reading, Glenn Erickson



November 19, 2013

Savant's new reviews today are:

Hannah Arendt
Blu-ray

From director Margarethe von Trotta comes a great new picture about a German-Jewish philosopher whose frank appraisal of the Adolf Eichmann trial in Israel made a lot of people angry. Hannah Arendt's take on the psychology of the Holocaust coined the phrase "The Banality of Evil" to describe Nazi mass murderers not as demons, but as people like you and me. The film stars the glowing talent Barbara Sukowa as Hannah. Who would have thought that philosophy and academic conflict would make an engrossing movie? In Blu-ray from Zeitgeist Films.
11/19/13

The Attack
Blu-ray

Ziad Doueiri's intense drama about tensions in Israel is an adaptation of a novel by Yasmina Khadra. An Arab surgeon who has won the trust and approval of Jews in Tel Aviv finds out that his own wife is a suicide bomber. The searing revelation turns into a personal mission to discover the who and the why -- nobody will believe that the doctor's wife couldn't possibly have done such a thing without being brainwashed. Doueiri's movie takes a sober look at irreconcilable conflict in a land where everyone is expected to take sides. In Blu-ray from the Cohen Film Collection.
11/19/13

and

Oliver!
Blu-ray

It's a big-scale family musical that Savant had never seen ... and it apparently didn't need my approval to be good. Ron Moody, Mark Lester, Shani Wallis, Oliver Reed and Jack Wild give memorable performances; Wallis and Oliver deliver knockouts. Carol Reed's direction is tops as are the memorable Lionel Bart songs and the overall production. Presented with full Road Show trappings and some nice extras. In Blu-ray from Twilight Time.
11/19/13




Hello!

I see few new books published about science fiction films, and so eagerly agreed to check out Applause's soft-cover edition of Dale Sherman's Armageddon Films FAQ, one title in a long series of genre- and special subject- related books. The subtitle is All That's Left to Know about Zombies, Contagions, Aliens, and the End of the World As We Know It. As with many film books that throw a lot of information at the reader, Sherman's work ends up best referred through the Index at the end. A first chapter gives a lot of fuzzy definitions about what constitutes the titles the book will cover, and why some films end up in some chapters isn't particularly intuitive. Sherman backs away from the guideline that the world must actually be destroyed or mankind wiped out, yet is still inconsistent in what he covers. The good news is that there is a great deal of information in here about films I haven't seen and some I'd rather read about than see. Sherman begins with excellent coverage of ten Apocalyptic Sci-fi books that haven't been adapted for the movies. And his breakdown of many classics and subgenres is well thought out. I've had my fill of zombie pictures, and Sherman has nicely laid out the main titles for study.

The text is pitched at a light, often joking level, which is okay except for a few small entries that barely make room for a smart remark or two. Also, although Sherman delves deep into some titles, comparing versions of The War of the Worlds with the original book, he doesn't do the same for the books behind When Worlds Collide. He also misses a few of what should be considered core pictures. Goke, Bodysnatcher from Hell gets major attention for its zombie theme, and one shot at the end that suggests that an apocalyptic event has occurred. But no mention is made of the Japanese Gorath, a key apocalyptic title. The word 'contagion' is in the book's defining subtitle but neither is the movie Contagion in the book. True, the plague in that movie doesn't wipe out human life, but I can't think of a movie with a more convincing apocalyptic atmosphere. It's more relevant than the various giant monsters Sherman covers, most of which barely threaten more than a city.

The somewhat scattered organization is just a quibble, as Armageddon Films is light reading, not an academic tome. I enjoyed Sherman's sense of humor, and I found a number of unfamiliar titles given concise and helpful write-ups. The book's tone is split between serious discussion and a far lighter agenda. For instance, an appendix offers Ten Things to Do to Survive the Apocalypse, hints taken from experience watching post-atomic dramas and zombie pix. I know that I'll dip back into Armageddon Films in the future, to check out Dale Sherman's take on a title or two.

Thanks for reading! Glenn Erickson



November 15, 2013

Savant's new reviews today are:

City Lights
Blu-ray + DVD

Charlie Chaplin's all-round best film balances his slapstick genius with bittersweet sentiments that transcend silent-movie conventions; it's one of the most compellingly human movies ever. The Tramp has comic adventures with a forgetful millionaire and engages in what is probably the best comic boxing scene ever filmed. It's all to help cure the blindness of a flower girl he's fallen in love with, who thinks him to be a rich man. A dual-format Blu-ray / DVD release from The Criterion Collection.
11/16/13

Sex Kittens Go to College
Extended 'hot' International Version

This insane comedy will have to be described as Performance Art, because it surely isn't funny -- or is it hilarious for not being funny? 'Sexpot' tassel-twirler Mamie Van Doren stirs up the hormones at Collins College. The kitchen sink screenplay pulls in 'goofy' gangsters, a beatnik chimpanzee and a disenchanted robot named Thinko; the amazing cast (as in, why did they do it?) includes Mijanou Bardot, Tuesday Weld, Louis Nye, Vampira, John Carradine, Jackie Coogan, Conway Twitty and Mickey Shaughnessy. Sex hounds take note: the WAC's perfect presentation is a hot 'international' version. Journalistic ethics compelled me to study and report every shameful detail. From The Warner Archive Collection.
11/16/13

and

The Way We Were
Blu-ray

No, not Godzilla vs. King Kong, but Streisand and Redford, in love in soft focus and steaming up the Panavision screen with smoldering looks, wistful farewells and devastatingly erotic forehead-brushing. 1973's blockbuster jettisoned its own blacklist theme and story thread in favor of the box office security of star-power glamour. Under the undeniably successful romantic story lie the bones of a daring (for its time) Hollywood story -- which is explained in two commentaries. A good documentary gives us the missing political scenes as well. Hamlisch's great music is present on an Isolated Score. In Blu-ray from Twilight Time.
11/16/13




Hello!

A couple of fun links today. Correspondent Jaci Spuhler offers a great article with a title that explains itself: Everything You Wanted to Know About the L.A. Aqueduct That Made Roman Polanski's Chinatown Famous. It contains other good links and an embedded BBC Scene By Scene show with a great interview with Polanski.

Gary Teetzel sends along this highly developed invention that, well, is too complicated to describe .... inFORM: Dynamic Shape Display. It's fascinating, but I must be a little imagination-challenged today -- I can't see exactly how it is to be put to use, except as a VERY arresting audio visual tool. The words "Interacting with digital information in a tangible way" aren't communicating anything to me. Helluva presentation, though.

Thanks for reading! Glenn Erickson



November 11, 2013

Savant's new reviews today are:

Cinerama Holiday
and
Cinerama South Seas Adventure

Blu-ray + DVD

Cinerama Road Show spectaculars #2 and #5 come to Blu-ray (+ DVD) as separate releases, each with an impressive roster of extras. Holiday sees two couples enjoying European and American sights and experiences for the giant 3-panel camera, while South Seas Adventure is a 'fictional travelogue' ranging from Hawaii to New Zealand. Equally entertaining is the complex story of how the films were rescued from oblivion and meticulously refurbished. In Smilebox. Blu-ray + DVD from Flicker Alley.
11/12/13

The Hitch-Hiker
Blu-ray

Based on a true story, this harrowing, groundbreaking noir suspenser has Frank Lovejoy and Edmond O'Brien taken for a one-way ride by William Talman's psychotic serial killer. This is the thriller with the gunman with one eye that never closes -- his victims can't tell when he's asleep. It's also the only film noir directed by a woman, Ida Lupino -- who was also Hollywood's only woman director for a couple of decades. In Blu-ray from Kino Classics.
11/12/13

and

Lion of the Desert
Blu-ray

Moustapha Akkad's epic of Libyan resistance to conquest by Italian Fascists is a slow but handsome, accurate telling of the strategic battles between an ambitious general (Oliver Reed) and the Libyan rebel Omar Mukhtar (Anthony Quinn), mounted on a lavish scale. Rod Steiger pulls the strings back in Rome as Mussolini, and Irene Papas is a suffering Bedouin woman. No surprises in the casting, but the leads are very good (Oliver Reed fans take note). Also being released at the same time is Akkad's other Islamic epic for western consumption, The Message. In Blu-ray from Anchor Bay.
11/12/13




Hello!

Happen to be somewhere in the vicinity of Leeds, in England? I know plenty of Sergio Leone fans that wish they were. UK correspondent Lee Broughton has programmed a special event in conjunction with the 27th Leeds International Film Festival.

At 7pm on Wednesday the 20th of November 2013, Professor Sir Christopher Frayling will present a lecture titled Once Upon a Time, the Western at Leeds Town Hall. At 8pm, the lecture will be followed by a screening of Sergio Leone's Once Upon a Time in the West.

Further information can be found here.

Two correspondents, Edward Sullivan and Ken Von Gunden confirmed that the man in the Hitchcock photos mentioned in the last post's links, is indeed Charles Addams, of The Addams Family fame. That's one mystery solved ...

Thanks for reading! Glenn Erickson



November 09, 2013

Savant's new reviews today are:

The Hobbit:
An Unexpected Journey

3D + Blu-ray + UltraViolet

Ten years ago Tolkien's Middle Earth trilogy became a trilogy of movies; and now Peter Jackson is doing the same 3- movie saga with one smaller book! This first Installment seems a bit repetitive and lacks variety in action and characters -- almost no humans or women, but funny dwarves, trolls and goofy goblins are at least some compensation. Martin Freeman is marvelous as the young Bilbo, and Ian McKellen is always welcome. Savant takes time out to talk about how the 48-per frame rate format experiment used for some theatrical engagements got a raw deal. A five disc set, with two entire HD discs set aside for extras. In 3D + Blu-ray + UltraViolet from Warner Home Video.
11/09/13

Intolerance:
Love's Struggle Throughout the Ages

Blu-ray

I never thought D.W. Griffith's picture could look this good again, but the tools of digital manipulation have been put to excellent use. The four-storyline silent masterpiece is grandiose in conception and often bold in execution, and so far ahead of its time that nothing like it has been attempted since. It may be the best film by the controversial Griffith, and it's certainly the most experimental. If you haven't seen it you've surely seen pictures of the five-story Babylon set; the magisterial trucking shots over its giant stairway are truly impressive. Comes with a great video introduction essay by Kevin Brownlow. In Blu-ray from Cohen Film Collection.
11/09/13

and

Greenwich Village:
Music that Defined a Generation

Director Laura Archibald assembles an exciting, musically snappy and historically eye-opening account of the folk music singer-songwriters that sprang from Manhattan's little artists' neighborhood, to become a major source of cultural innovation in the '50s and '60s. With many interviews from Those Who Were There and tons of interesting talent including Lucy and Carly Simon, Michelle Phillips, Peter Yarnow, Don McLean, Tom Chapin, Judy Collins, Buffy Sainte-Marie and Melanie. A lot of the history is of the dark variety, as the blacklist successfully kept some of these greats from performing in America, for years. Overall, a great celebration, from Pete Seeger through Bob Dylan to The Mamas and the Papas. From Kino Lorber.
11/09/13




Hello!

Another smash deadline today -- I had to to some construction work this A.M. and now have run out of time again. But the reviews were finished last night, and buttoned up neat and tidy.

I've got one great link to offer, forwarded by Gary Teetzel. It's a series of photos posted by a different 'Gary' at the entertaining Classic Horror Film Board, which constitute LIFE magazine's coverage of an Alfred Hitchcock Haunted House Party that he threw in New York around the time he filmed The Wrong Man. The person posting the photos seems to think that a man posing in pictures with Hitch is none other than cartoonist Charles Addams. Can anybody confirm this?

Thanks for reading! Glenn Erickson



November 04, 2013

Savant's new reviews today are:

Barbara
Blu-ray

Nina Hoss plays Barbara, an East German doctor of 1980 who has the temerity to ask for an exit visa. She's immediately reassigned to a provincial clinic and kept under surveillance -- by other doctors in the clinic as well. Barbara worries about the fate of an escapee from a local "delinquent work farm" that locals consider an extermination camp -- and prepares to make her own escape attempt to the West. This 2012 picture was a big award winner in Germany and Europe. In Blu-ray from Adopt Films / Kino Lorber.
11/05/13

The Third Day
Blu-ray

Jack Smight directs George Peppard in an amnesia-themed thriller with an interesting cast: Elizabeth Ashley, Roddy MacDowall, Herbert Marshall, Arthur O'Connell, Arte Johnson and Sally Kellerman. After an auto accident, the memory-challenged Peppard learns that he's a wealthy playboy despised by the community for planning to close the factory for a fast profit. It's Herbert Marshall's final film, and Sally Kellerman's first big studio role. In Blu-ray from The Warner Archive Collection.
11/05/13

and

I Married a Witch
Blu-ray

René Clair's practically perfect witchcraft comedy sees Veronica Lake return from the dead to deliver a horrible -- but romantic -- curse to the latest member of the Wooley family, Fredric March. A lighter touch was never seen in a screwball comedy; along for the fun is Robert Benchley as a flummoxed best friend and Cecil Kellaway as a delightfully infernal warlock. A pre-stardom Susan Hayward gets to throw conniption fits, too. This show was reportedly an inspiration for the TV series Bewitched, but it's far funnier, not mention more sexy. In Blu-ray from The Criterion Collection.
11/05/13




Hello!

Dick Dinman has his newest radio shows up, all four of them -- Versatile Master of the Macabre Vincent Price Part One, Part Two and Part Three welcome Price's daugher Victoria to discuss the new Shout! Factory Poe pictures, his comedy roles, and Fox's new Blu-ray of The Fly. Then in Dick Dinman and George Feltenstein Enter the 3-D House of Wax, the interviewer learns from the Warner V.P. about the myriad technical challenges restoring the biggest hit of the '50's 3-D craze to its full glory.

I am presently laboring over a review for the Cohen Film Collection's new Blu-ray of Intolerance. The weekend's reviews won a lot of reader approval, along with plenty of corrections for typos and name-scramblings. They're now ready for serious reading. A neighbor also left some old books out with a note announcing a free giveaway. One was an ancient, faded hardbound volume called "Writer's Guide and Index to English", dated 1942. Sample contents: Chapter Ten, subheading one : Inconsistencies in English Spelling. I have placed this book to the right of my desk, where I can rest my head on it for inspiration, when needed.

Thanks for Reading! Glenn Erickson



November 02, 2013

Savant's new reviews today are:

Mad Men
Season Six

Blu-ray

Is this the penultimate season, or should the split-in-two seventh season be called seasons seven and eight? Through triumph and travails, the adventures of the ad men and women in Serling Cooper Draper Pryce have been struggling, sinning, boozing and smoking for a decade. Now key people leave and return in a merger, the business flips upside down and the 'wonder' pitch man Don Draper goes into a personal and professional tailspin. Savant tries to sum up the appeal of this, the only one of the millennial cable series he's followed, so far. The set contains three Blu-ray discs and is from Lionsgate.
11/02/13

Nosferatu:
A Symphony of Horror

Blu-ray

The Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau Stiftung has come up with another definitive restoration, this time presented with English inter-titles and a second version in the original German. Murnau's pirated version of Bram Stoker's Dracula substitutes a spiritual philosophy for Christian symbols, so forget the crosses and holy water. The basic setup is intact but Stoker's complicated characters are replaced by evil telepathic powers and a heroine who redeems humanity through a sexual surrender. And forget handsome gentleman vampires, as Max Schreck's ghoulish horror is like some bug crawled out from under a rock. Murnau and his cameraman can make with the nightmarish imagery as well -- this genre foundation stone invented a LOT of the graphic iconography that has stuck around for the last 91 years. With some fascinating extras; in Blu-ray from Kino Classics.
11/02/13

and

The Best Years of Our Lives
Blu-ray

The films of William Wyler just keep growing in stature and appeal. This liberal tale of veterans returning to face unexpected problems at home is honest, heartfelt, compassionate and unflinching; it practically invented the post-war social consciousness movie. Postively brimming with integrity and passion in all departments -- MacKinlay Kantor's book, Robert Sherwood's script, Wyler's direction and the playing of a cast so perfect we can't imagine replacements: Myrna Loy, Fredric March, Teresa Wright, Dana Andrews, Cathy O'Donnell, Harold Russell, Virginia Mayo, Hoagy Carmichael, Gladys George, Roman Bohnen, Ray Collins, Steve Cochran. If you haven't yet seen this, set aside three uninterrupted hours -- it'll seem half as long. From the Samuel Goldwyn Collection, in Blu-ray from Warner Home Video.
11/02/13




Hello!

It's a late afternoon and Savant is POOT, to wit, Plumb Out Of Time. With that poor excuse I'll simply say that I continue to be pleasantly surprised by new discs -- Kino's Barbara (Blu-ray) is excellent, and I had a fine time watching the first watchable version of D.W. Griffith's Intolerance (Blu-ray) from the Cohen Film Collection -- the movie looks sensational.

Shout! Factory has sent along their Mystery Science Theater 3000 tin, which is packed with favorites, although I'm probably going to be on a slow boil through their roasting of Gorgo. Also in the hopper is The Warner Archives' The Third Day and Into the Arms of Strangers; Warners' The Hobbit, part one (Blu-ray/3D), Anchor Bay's Lion of the Desert (Blu-ray), Criterion's I Married a Witch (Blu-ray) and La Notte (Blu-ray); Kino's The Hitch-Hiker (Blu-ray), Greenwich Village: Music that Inspired a Generation and Russian Ark (Blu-ray); and Zeitgeist's Hannah Arendt (Blu-ray).

That should keep me busy. Thanks for reading! Glenn Erickson


Don't forget to write Savant at dvdsavant@mindspring.com.

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